Chris Coombes paints the interiors of upscale apartments.

Result #1

Chris Coombes paints the interiors of upscale apartments. The walls are painted a glazed ceramic, the windows are covered with a rusted iron, and the furniture is painted with a lustrous sheen of gold and silver. They are painted with a gloss of gold and silver and contain plastic objects, such as a tiny gold cup and a gold chain. Coombes is fascinated by the way light and space are created and disrupted by the material and the reflection of light. His works are like the illusions of illusions, where the mind can see the world as if it were a piece of glass; where the glass is in the mirror of the world.The New York Times had a lot of fun with this. They took a page out of the shoe shop and painted the front pages of the paper with a gold-glitter-glitter effect. They made a gold-glitter version of the front page. The front page of the New York Times, the New York Post, and the New York Daily News are all painted gold, and they are all covered with gold glitters. The gold glitters are also covered with gold, and it looks as if the gold glitters were made by the artists. The gold glitters are the same gold as the gold and silver in the front pages.The most interesting thing about Coombes is his ability to make paintings that are interesting, intelligent, and beautiful. His paintings arent just clever. They are also very convincing. The gold glitters, the gold mirrors, and the gold-glitter are all there, but they arent really there, and they dont seem to be in the paintings. They arent even in the paintings. The gold-glitter-glitters are like the mirages of a fancy mirror. They look like little gold-and-silver fragments of an imagined world.

Result #2

Chris Coombes paints the interiors of upscale apartments. His paintings are a precise record of the architecture of the rooms he has lived in over the past year, and they are also the most detailed I have seen in some time. Their subtle, almost painterly application of acrylic paint, which gives them a light, glistening quality, is suggestive of the softness of their surfaces. They are also intensely colored, with a warm gray, a kind of warm pink, and a fuchsia tone. They are also intensely spatial. They are made up of repeated elements that are made to seem discrete, to seem at once individual and part of a larger whole.The interiors are often made up of two or three windows, sometimes with slits through which the visitor may pass, as if looking through a glass to a different world. The windows are also made up of two or three horizontal sections. The interiors are sometimes divided into two or three sections by a diagonal line, as in the case of two windows in a room, and sometimes split into two by the addition of a wedge-shaped wall—a vertical line that also seems to imply the existence of a third, lower section. Coombes uses the two-dimensional space of the paintings to bring into play the two-dimensional space of the window sections. They become two-dimensional windows on the interior, and they overlap, as if to form a door, an entrance, or an entrance to another room. But these windows are also two-dimensional, and they are painted. The paint is applied with a brush, leaving a richly layered surface of smudgy smears. The paint seems to be scattered over the surface of the paint so that the surface itself seems to be a kind of material—a surface that is one of the objects on which the paint is scattered. The paint is applied in a thin, somewhat sandy manner. The brushstrokes are loose and light.

Result #3

Chris Coombes paints the interiors of upscale apartments. The citys chaotic, dystopian, and dystopian side is rendered in this artists playful style of woodblock print, which, with its fastidious yet spare stylization, suggests a kind of synthesis between the color-saturated, dynamic, and abstracted and the gritty, confrontational, and, of course, the real. The pictures are executed in acrylic on linen and are set against a backdrop of concrete, and in the context of the building, the concrete is itself the background. This is not a space of the imagination, but a space of the body, and the images suggest the stasis of the building, the isolation of the bodies from the surrounding world. But the photos are also about the bodies, and the objects are also bodies. The walls are made of concrete, and the pieces of furniture are painted with a taut, sensual, industrial look. The furniture is made of concrete, and, as the photos suggest, it is a concrete chair, a brick, and a concrete-lined suitcase. The interiors are also painted in a painterly way; they are made of concrete and have a matte finish. The colors are very vivid, and the light is a vivid shade of blue.Coombes is interested in the different ways people are brought together. In one photograph, two women look at each other, and in another, two men sit side by side on a couch. In one of the photos, a man with a scarf hangs back from the woman, while another man and woman are seen from behind. The images show the women as they would appear to be in their everyday environment. In another photo, a man stands alone, and a woman with a scarf is at his feet. The two men are seen from behind. The picture is repeated in a couple of other pictures, and this repetition is emphasized by the fact that the scarf and the man are both covered in paint.

Result #4

Chris Coombes paints the interiors of upscale apartments. These images have a very specific, very precise look, a high-tech look to them. In some of the images, the outside is almost completely obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, a thin layer of clear plastic that creates a kind of secondary ground on which the scene itself is clearly visible. The look of these images is a little eerie, as if you were looking into a small, miniature mirror in which you could look at yourself in a mirror inside the apartment.Coombes paints the interiors with the kind of light that most people have only for moments, when they are standing in front of a television set. On the outside, he paints a lighted window, so that the image of the apartment is partially obscured by a glass of water. On the inside, he paints a window that is partially covered by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene itself is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene itself is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas. The scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas, so that the scene is partially obscured by a sheet of Plexiglas.

Result #5

Chris Coombes paints the interiors of upscale apartments. His most successful images are those of their interiors: a large-format, bright-orange neon sign on a building facade, a high-ceilinged, faux-Spanish-style apartment that has been painted a warm, bright, and yellowish green. There are also several photos of the walls of a suburban house in which the lights are out and the windows are covered in a black-and-white pattern. This work, like the others, is a very personal, abstract, and ironic take on urban architecture.In his recent show at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Work, Life, Death, Time, Coombes presented a new series of paintings that are all the same size and similar in color scheme, but with a slight variation in the way they are painted. The new work is also the same size as his previous works, but now with a smaller frame around the edges, so that the paintings seem to be suspended between the wall and the painting. It is as if the paintings were sculptures, suspended in midair, and each one seems to be a sort of miniature version of the other. The small scale of the works recalls the small scale of the neon signs, but it is the way the paintings are painted that gives the work a certain weightiness. The paint is applied with a suction gun, which makes it easy to see the way the paint is being sucked into the paint. The paintings are hung on the wall, but they are not pinned down to the wall; they are free to move about. These are small, hard-edged works that have a certain presence, but not a lot of volume. The works are not often hung on the wall, but they do have to be pushed in, and that is the best thing to do.

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