The environmental art practice of Les Levine in the 1960s as it relates to Marshall McLuhan's theorization of the counter-environment, intermedia, and ecological formations of envrionment

Result #1

The environmental art practice of Les Levine in the 1960s as it relates to Marshall McLuhan's theorization of the counter-environment, intermedia, and ecological formations of envrionment, and so on. In recent years, the sense of crisis has become a dominant theme, and it is no longer the products of individual artists or movements. The crisis of our time is the result of the destructive forces of our technological, economic, and social system. If art can serve as a tool for combating the crisis, then it can also be a vehicle of political resistance to the state of affairs.At the opening of this show, Nils Gjergansson commented on the links between the art world and the media in a series of articles that appeared in the Swedish press. In this way, he echoed the ideas of the theoretician George Weierström, who sees art as a media device for reporting on the state of the world. Weierströms arguments are based on the observation that communication can be both a means of control and of emancipation. He proposes that the media can serve as a tool of social control and control, which can be achieved through the use of communication devices such as television, radio, and the Internet. Gjergansson, in his article, called for an artistic approach that avoids the use of the media, but also for a media-oriented attitude. He stresses the importance of a positive attitude in art, and therefore of the presence of art in the gallery space. The gallery is a positive space in which to hold an exhibition, to work, and to be in dialogue with the world. The gallery is also a place to discuss art, to learn from it, and to learn about the world. Gjergansson sees art as a space of dialogue, but he does not think that art should be used as propaganda or to promote a particular political position. He is not interested in the politics of art; instead, he aims at the art world as a positive space that encourages positive attitudes toward art.

Result #2

The environmental art practice of Les Levine in the 1960s as it relates to Marshall McLuhan's theorization of the counter-environment, intermedia, and ecological formations of envrionment, and thus to the artist's status as a creative agent in the market economy. The artist's relationship to the market is also a matter of concern. In the early 80s, Levine contributed to the New Left's insistence on the importance of the self and its participation in the globalized world economy, while in the 90s, she continues to engage in a form of environmental activism. Her first solo exhibition, which opened at the New Museum in New York in 2002, consisted of a series of drawings and a few objects. The drawings were more often than not related to her previous work—that is, to drawings of other artists' works and of her own. A number of the drawings, in fact, were made in collaboration with the artist, who had previously made them for her and others. This was a fitting way of approaching the period, as it also reflected Levine's personal interest in the relationship between artists and their audiences. Indeed, the drawings were often based on photographs, images of herself, or other artists' works, as well as on photographs taken by the artist herself. The drawings thus featured a range of formal properties, ranging from the abstract (the grid, the composition of the image) to the figurative (the figure in the foreground, or of a photograph of herself). The formal elements of these drawings—the grid and the grid—are also elements of the body, which is made manifest through the figure's physical presence. They also serve as an implicit signifier of time and thus of the passage of time. The grid, too, is an abstract element. It is a metaphor for the body's movement, a map of the body's movement through space.In the drawings, Levine's hand is often seen as a participant in the process of drawing, as it traces lines on the paper, as if to create a grid of the pages, with each line marking a passage through the work.

Result #3

The environmental art practice of Les Levine in the 1960s as it relates to Marshall McLuhan's theorization of the counter-environment, intermedia, and ecological formations of envrionment in the 70s, and the cultural production of the 80s, the work of Susan Martins and the work of other artists is also of interest. The works of Martins, for instance, are often more conceptual than any of the artists whose names are included in this exhibition, and this is not to say that they are not important works. But their critical potential is not sufficiently addressed in the exhibition. In particular, the work of Martins, as in that of the artists whose names are included, is often diminished by the inclusion of works that are themselves, or were in some way involved with the decomposition of the body as the work of art, while the work of artists whose names are not included is often either merely subverted by a simple repetition of their names or, in the case of Martins, only by the presence of the titles. The result is a kind of extreme mimicry of the subversive and critical activity of the 70s, with its role in the dismantling of art and culture, and its resulting implications for the present.The work of Martins is particularly interesting in this context because it is based on a theory of power, and it is based on a theory of the artist as the creator of art. In her catalogue essay, Martins suggests that the role of the artist in relation to the art institution is to be part of a cooperative activity with the institution. She speaks of an atmosphere of mutual trust and cooperation, and she asserts that this is a necessary condition for the creation of art. But the fact that the artist is seen as a participant in the institution, as a participant in the institution, is the result of a different relationship, one that is destructive and destructive, and one that breaks down the relationship between the artist and the institution. This is not to say that the institution is not an active participant; it is more important than that. The institution is an individual and the individual is an institution.

Result #4

The environmental art practice of Les Levine in the 1960s as it relates to Marshall McLuhan's theorization of the counter-environment, intermedia, and ecological formations of envrionment. The two works in this show were from the series Vegetable Gardens, 1974, which included a photograph of a handful of flowers (I am reminded of Michael Asher's photographs of bees, but here the flowers were positioned in a garden outside the gallery) and a pencil drawing of a wall with two green patterns of lines.The other works in the show were from the series Lid, 1978–80, and were made of colored paper that had been dried and hardened. The forms were made from paper that had been crushed and folded, and the shapes were derived from the folds. The paper was placed on the wall and was thus open to be rearranged and reused. In this way, the works had an organic, organic, and even organic, quality. The paper was essentially a material that was a part of the material world, a kind of raw material, and the pieces were painted on it. The artist also used cardboard as a support, but it was painted with a light, industrial color, and the cardboard was not folded. The cardboard was also used to form the forms in the series, and the artist folded it before using it as a support. The result was a kind of oeuvre that evoked a certain domestic environment, a home-made interior that is constructed of material.The artist also used torn paper to make drawings and collages, and he used paper made of paper, which has a soft, porous quality, as a material. The drawings were also made of paper that had been crushed, but the residue of the crushed paper was visible on the surface of the collages. The paper was used to create the drawings and collages. The drawings were made of paper that had been crushed, but it was not the crumpled paper that was used to create these drawings and collages. The paper was the paper of the drawings, and the paper that had been crumpled.

Result #5

The environmental art practice of Les Levine in the 1960s as it relates to Marshall McLuhan's theorization of the counter-environment, intermedia, and ecological formations of envrionment, is often given as evidence. While Levine's work, especially the installations of the 60s, has become increasingly important in the discourse on art, it remains problematic in the current, hypercritical discourse on environmental art. The cultural context in which Levine was born, his family's relocation to New York in 1957, and his subsequent decision to become a part of the avant-garde of New York, have made him a less-favored artist, but one whose influence has been felt in the work of a number of contemporary artists. The question is whether the more prominent figures who are now drawing on his legacy will continue to do so.Levine's work has often been seen as a reflection of the cultural landscape in which he was born. It is tempting to see his work as an extension of a dominant trend in contemporary art, such as that of the more familiarized use of post-Modernist formalisms. The fact is that his work has never been seen as an attempt to critique the cultural landscape. Rather, he has always been a direct expression of the artist's awareness of his place in the landscape. His work has always dealt with the question of the relationship between art and life, and his work has often been understood as a critique of the artist's place within the landscape. Yet, given that many of his works have been seen as the expression of a desire for transcendence, it is difficult to believe that Levine is not also a conscious, conscious, and deeply felt individual. He was an artist who lived in the land of his birth and who sought to transcend the land, the land of his birth and art, and to transcend art's place within the landscape.In this exhibition, Levine's work was presented as the result of a process of identification with the land, a search for a way to inhabit it. This was a search for a way to experience the world and to understand it.

©2021 Lucidbeaming