He makes Didactic artwork that is raw and industrial and spontaneous.

Result #1

He makes Didactic artwork that is raw and industrial and spontaneous. The materials—from clothes to furniture—are easily recognizable, and the forms, which can be read from the outside, are often obvious, but only in their inscrutable presence. In this way, the artist is a walking embodiment of the most diverse elements of everyday life: the still life, the domestic space, the industrial object, the everyday world as seen through art.Although the works are generally small, they reveal a great deal about the artists personal life. In Untitled, 1987, a photograph of a man in a green suit, which was taken in the garden of the artists parents house in Berlin, is covered with hundreds of tiny figures; the pictures are printed on linen, and the fabric has been tied together with a knot. The intimate nature of these objects and their fragile material presence give the pictures an uncanny quality. And the intimate quality is apparent not only in the small size of the objects but also in the way they are made: by hand, with great care. The fabric is stretched and torn, sometimes just slightly, sometimes just massively. The pieces are made of the same materials as the objects. The result is a dense yet fragile texture, a tactile, tactile surface that is as much about the feeling of touch as it is about the object itself. This texture is also a visual texture, as the photographs show. In Untitled, 1987, the thick fabric that covers the whole surface of the photograph is covered in a fine white grid, suggesting a transparent surface. The grid is a reference to a pattern, and so the images are images of a grid. The image of a grid is also a material one, in that it is made of thousands of tiny pieces of cloth. The cloth is stained and bleached, and the lines that form the grid are clearly visible. The image of the grid is also a material one: the grid is printed on the fabric. The surface of the print is the surface of the canvas, the canvas of the print.

Result #2

He makes Didactic artwork that is raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.  He makes works that are raw and industrial and spontaneous.  He is a raw and industrial artist.

Result #3

. . . His art is wild and energetic and he is at his best when he is at his best.

Result #4

He makes Didactic artwork that is raw and industrial and spontaneous. . . . The result is a subject that is often considered a formalist dead end, and one that is worth discussing. The work is not conceptual; it is not even conceptual. Its problem is that it is too much conceptual. It is not conceptual because it is conceptual; it is conceptual because it is conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual. The problem is that it is too much conceptual because it is too much conceptual.

Result #5

He makes Didactic artwork that is raw and industrial and spontaneous. . . . a good example of the previous generation of artist-realists. What is truly important is not the personages, but rather the quality of their sensibility. They are not the raw, expressive, naked figures that are sometimes found in the new figurative art. The figures, like the figures in the frescoes, are very concrete and concrete in their form, and are made of light, hard metal. They are sculptural and physical, as well as pictorial and physical. The artist has taken the traditional pictorial figure and transformed it in a highly abstract and physical manner. They are more than figures, they are symbols, and the number 1, the number 6, the letter I, the letter o, and the letter a form a symbol of communication. The letter is also a symbol of the artist. The letter, like the body, is a concrete and physical, almost religious, form.The frescoes are made of light-hard wood and are made of wood, as if they were fresco paintings. They are all of a very flat, straight and vertical nature. The frescoes are not made of wood, but of light-hardwood, and are made of light-hardwood. The wood is painted with a light touch and is often in the shape of a pine cone. The light-hardwood is often painted with a light touch, as in one fresco, in which a shape of pine cone is also the shape of the fresco. The fresco is the surface of the fresco; it is the plane that is cut away from the plane of the fresco. In this fresco, the pine cone is not cut away from the plane of the fresco, but is merely an extension of it. The pine cone is a pictorial element, the plane of the fresco. The fresco is also a pictorial element.

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