This is a work of fiction. The character, incidents, and locations portayed and the names herein are fictitious, and any similarity to or identification with the location, name, character or history of any person, product or entity is entirely coincidental and unintentional

Result #1

This is a work of fiction. The character, incidents, and locations portayed and the names herein are fictitious, and any similarity to or identification with the location, name, character or history of any person, product or entity is entirely coincidental and unintentional.This is a story about memory. In the story, the death of a woman in a violent act is the event for which the artist is remembered. The story ends with a split-second statement, an echo of a split-second before the victim disappears. The artist (now the character), a man, is asked to describe his recollection of the event. He describes the events of the night before, and they describe a group of people, all of whom have left the scene of the crime. A pause occurs and he describes the mood of the audience. The audience is made aware that the artist, the spectator, the writer, the spectator himself are all part of the same story. The artist, once again, is the one who is retelling the story.His theme is the impact of unconscious events on memory. In the text, the artist speaks of how the images that flash across the screen of the television induce a pattern of associations . . . a sort of control of the unconscious. The artist seems to be asking what is happening in his own world and in the world of the other. His statement is a direct statement of his own subjective experience and feeling. He refers to the images and their relationship to the artist and viewer. He continues, The artist, as the unconscious, becomes the artist, and the artist as the unconscious becomes the artist. The artist has become the artist. The artist becomes the artist. The artist as the unconscious, which makes the artist the one who controls the unconscious. The artist as the one who is the unconscious, which controls the unconscious. The artist as the artist who controls the unconscious. The artist as the artist who makes the unconscious control the artist.The artist is the one who makes the unconscious control the artist. The artist is the one who is the one who makes the unconscious control the artist. The artist as the one who is the one who is the one who controls the unconscious.

Result #2

This is a work of fiction. The character, incidents, and locations portayed and the names herein are fictitious, and any similarity to or identification with the location, name, character or history of any person, product or entity is entirely coincidental and unintentional. (C) is a fictional person and he is the artist, who is represented by himself, a fictitious photographic portrait, and an imaginary automobile, or a fictional text that identifies him as the artist. The photographs have been transferred from a photographic source, an existing book, and he has been added to it. The text is a highly personal and seemingly meaningless description of his life and situation. In the text, he describes his reasons for establishing his artistic existence, the types of images he uses and the experience of each image, which he discusses in an interview with the curator, Llyn Foulkes, on the occasion of the exhibition. It is a kind of self-evident explanation of a pseudoscientific, pseudoscientific statement. The photographs and the texts are presented as documents of the artist; they are no more than the artist has done with a book. The photographs are highly stylized and so familiar, in their aesthetic and descriptive qualities, as to seem almost a mythological invention. The texts, on the other hand, are written by Llyn Foulkes in a personal style. Their significance is obscure and their meaning is merely obscure. The photographs and the texts, while not invented, do not look as if they were created by someone who has not studied photography. In fact, the photographs are derived from photographs taken in the artist's hometown of New York. The photographs are unphotographed, but have been photored in an image that has been transferred to the book. This transfer is a process that would, in fact, be impossible to reproduce, but it is effected by the artist.Llyn Foulkes, who was once an accomplished illustration artist, has greatly expanded his vocabulary of techniques and created new visual concepts. His talent is matched by that of his curator. She has created an exhibition that is both an experience and an intellectual tour de force. It is a thoroughly engaging exhibition, and one that is both revealing and compelling.

Result #3

. The work is therefore a fantasy and a fiction, an ideal, an illusion. The artist is, in the words of John C. Bennett, a character of fiction. The fact is that the imagination and language are de-skilled. The erotic scene is a fantasy of an erotic moment, a fantasy of the erotic, but not a mannered fantasy. In addition, the pictures are of a kind of non-interference. They are not nakedly male, and the subject matter is not the male nude. But they are men. The images are an abstraction of male fantasy. They are not men, but men. Their costumes are not male, but are clothing. Their hair is not men, but is an art-nouveau pattern of hairstyles. The erotic scene is a male fantasy. The man is a male fantasy, but one that has been repressed and denigrated. The male fantasy is present in the erotic scene as a kind of silence and an absence, a persona. The artist, the erotic woman, and the male fantasy are two separate aspects of the same reality.

Result #4

This is a work of fiction. The character, incidents, and locations portayed and the names herein are fictitious, and any similarity to or identification with the location, name, character or history of any person, product or entity is entirely coincidental and unintentional.Dokoupils work is based on the idea that the world, as we know it, is constructed and that it functions like a story, one that is frequently interrupted by the time of the mirroring, the projection, and the rewriting of the story. In this way, Dokoupil relates to the creation of a new reality, a new way of life, by which the world, as constructed by the artist, is constructed and re-formed by him and then made anew. The mirroring of the world is repeated by the projection of images onto the surfaces of the mirrors. Thus, in one case, a reflection of a mirror appears to be the work of a hand holding a knife. The hand is the work of the artist who has made a knife the work of his hand, but then remade it. And this remade knife is also a reflection of the work of the artist who has made a mirror and a knife the work of his hand, but then remade them. And this is what Dokoupil does with his mirrors, to make the image of a knife that was remade by the artist into one of his mirrors. It is the work of an artist who has lost the knife and has made it his own. The knives reappear in the projection of a photographic image of the knife, suggesting that it is no longer a knife but a blade. The discoloration of the knife is reflected on the film of a mirror. The reflection of the knife, which had been transformed into a reflection of a knife, becomes a mirror reflection of the knife, a reflection of the mirror.

Result #5

. The names of the artist and the artist-designer are not included in the work, but have been provided for the viewer. The works are, however, excellent examples of a creative synergy in which the use of imagination, imagination and art are paired. And this is the ideal condition of the creative imagination.

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