The show by Lucidbeaming has frame, binding, furniture, interior, room, home theater, theater, building, petal, wall clock, clock, timepiece, monitor, and liquid crystal display.

Result #1

The show by Lucidbeaming has frame, binding, furniture, interior, room, home theater, theater, building, petal, wall clock, clock, timepiece, monitor, and liquid crystal display. In a white-walled exhibition space, a structure resembling a large number-plate by Buren (looking like the tip of a top) lives at a diagonal with a closed door; there is a black tape recorder and a clock face with a dimmed voice recorder; there are speakers for a music system; there are speakers for a speakerphone. The sound is recorded, and there is a video of a carpet-covered wall on which a voice at times sags like a mother sucking her child. Fades in and out of black are spaced out, sometimes stopping for a moment. The single old timer is up to eight minutes left and the clock is blinking; then, as if by magic, the door closes.The video lampooning is reminiscent of a deranged version of Virilio Pericles Risk of Knowing, where the slow fade from black to white repeats endlessly. The difference is that Pericles has written his piece in the 80s, he is only 30 years old. The slow fade of the past can be an act of mutual intellectual dissonance. The works art-system logic is now so thoroughly reinforced, even to be literally implicit in the piece. That the artists logic is so severe is more often demonstrated by the numerous omissions in this installation—a built-in speaker system; a taping system; a documentary camera; an exercise tape of the artist talking about art; a mathematical calculation that suggests a qualitative difference in timing between a timer being up and off and one being on and off; a sound track that does not accompany the installation; a clock; and no sound from the video. The psychological and physical distance from the audience that renders these elements unacceptable is reduced to a minimum by the video.The last piece is a series of replicas of an old black-and-white photograph depicting a train; three replicas are hung on a high wall.

Result #2

The show by Lucidbeaming has frame, binding, furniture, interior, room, home theater, theater, building, petal, wall clock, clock, timepiece, monitor, and liquid crystal display. If the speakers of these are not luminous, they are, in their artificial state, emotional; indeed, the work has become a feeling thing. Gays novels and stories were a formative influence on him; the lucidity of his reflections on life and art and the transcendence of both make for a particular literary idiomaticity. The unconventional beauty of these works is the dramatic voice of a young man set apart from every normal relationship. This is the curse of humans who have lost the ability to reconcile nature and nurture itself. Then the voice is so loud it can no longer be silenced; it becomes a challenge. Everyone is challenged by what we have lost, and everyone is also looking for a way to reconcile nature and nurture it. This is the strength of the Lucidbeaming; one can look and feel the madness in this work, but that does not mean that it necessarily indicates the insanity of the world. The works, like the other works in this show, are persuasive and articulate.The open, ready-made, un-imagined, playful, and schizophrenic qualities of Lucidbeaming are what make this work compelling; it is, in effect, a memoir of an altered state. The artist has taken his own madness as a form of expression and has called it an art. That it is still in the state of being only makes the contradiction more poignant. In the work, there are forms; but they are all traced and they are all in a constant state of disappearance.The schizophrenic condition, with its desire and anxiety, is an idea in Lucidbeaming; it is also a sense of alienation and alienation from the world, a twisted sense of reality. The absence of any trace of reality is both the point of departure for Lucidbeaming and the realization of his radical challenge. It is as if the total unconscious were in rebellion; it refuses to be dominated by the external world, and seeks its own autonomy.

Result #3

The show by Lucidbeaming has frame, binding, furniture, interior, room, home theater, theater, building, petal, wall clock, clock, timepiece, monitor, and liquid crystal display. These are not form-bound objects. They are contained objects, yet they are alive with feelings of internal movement. In Lucidbeaming, the reality of the body is not even considered. It is simply the fact of being there. The series of eight color photographs, which comprise the bulk of the exhibition, are the work of twenty-two artists who have been working together as a collective community since 1972. Their drawings, photographs, and sculpture explore the relationship between two- and three-dimensional space, geometry, and play.In their photographs, these artists take photos of themselves, themselves with others, and others, with other people. They both self-portrait and self-portrait as a group. In one drawing, Self Portrait as a Group of Two, they give a half-humorous and half-erotic depiction of themselves, while two-dimensional, four-dimensional figures look like themselves. In another, Self Portrait as a Party Lady, they enter a formal party and proceed to a dance in a disco. In still another, Self Portrait as an Old-Fashioned Old Lady, they enter a nightclub. They go to a nightclub on a regular basis, and take several cocktails. It is surprising that at this point they do not engage in some type of sex act. Rather, they become passive performers, in a kind of theater that they perform. It is not necessary to know the identities of the performers in these photographs. The figures in the photos are not even identified with themselves. The objects they occupy are only shown and contained in their own ambience. In one of the photographs, a speaker system makes it clear that the photos are no longer self-portraits. The images are all dead. A group of naked women that have been dead for two hours play with a video camera in a video room. They appear to be more like images of dancing in a nightclub than acting.

Result #4

The introductory panel shows the walls of the gallery floor, with only the corner, on which Lucidbeaming placed the stenciled stencils, in a bright and vibrant color scheme; next to this panel a digital clock face is displayed. The clock face is moving, and the spectator is haunted by the seemingly perpetual, now almost disquieting sounds of his or her own heartbeat. Here Lucidbeaming demonstrates the absolute necessity for the artificiality of the clocks, which simultaneously undermines our belief that time is absolute and contributes to our belief that time is created, as opposed to the, creation of time. The inexorable pulse of time is made palpable by the stencils, which certainly seem an attempt to denote the human body, and at the same time a more intimate attempt to evoke the immateriality of space. From this purely physical point of view, Lucidbeaming shows us how the timelessness of the clock is, of course, simultaneous with the immateriality of space—a space composed of matter that contains both the body and the universe. Lucidbeaming continues her investigation of the possibility of giving form to the immaterial, to the body as both body and space. In her version of the street, she carries her work beyond the philosophical and esthetic dimension of its historical reproduction.

Result #5

The show by Lucidbeaming has frame, binding, furniture, interior, room, home theater, theater, building, petal, wall clock, clock, timepiece, monitor, and liquid crystal display. The twelve pieces range in size from smaller to large, and are designed to move around the space in various ways. In addition to the usual work done on a custom layout, Lucidbeaming has also done a whole room of wall clocks and a small room of coffee tables with their hands on the wall. In addition to these works, he has painted a wall, floor, and ceiling of Christmas tree-like pieces of wood (all the works were installed in a white space in the gallery). The gallerys back wall had been illuminated with red, and windows showed the beginning of the other night sequence. As the fire burned down, Lucidbeaming decided to replace the flames by a small one, but that worked only briefly, as the fire burned out quickly. The cameras initial close-up revealed an image of flames on a red-painted wall. The camera had been moved away, and then replaced by one of Lucidbeamings own photographs taken on another wall. From this second camera, he filmed a crowd of people approaching and walking past one another, while the flames burned up. Finally, the image showed up in a short film that was shown on a monitor. The viewer watched the spectacle of a happy group of people, both dancing and looking miserable, enjoying the evening.The film is two minutes long, but by the end it is clear that the crowd is already moving, that the flow of the crowd is already behind them, that they have entered an exhibition which is already over. In fact, the exhibition is already over, and the fire has already begun. The same concept shows up in a television series, a newspaper, a magazine, and a video; it is the same concept as in Lucidbeamings installation.In Lucidbeams work, the viewer is not a participant. His work is not a single-point of view, nor is it an isolated event. It is a single shot.

©2021 Lucidbeaming