Untitled creates a space of psychological tension. The girl hanging in the air is almost like a living human being, but at the same time unreal and cyborg-like. Cyborgs are humans or animals with an electronic device or part thereof integrated. In principle, a human with a pacemaker meets the definition of the cyborg. The sleeping figure - or, in computer terms, the character in standby mode - is surrounded by empty, sterile space that highlights the distance of the viewer. The girl's body weight is on her chin, which rests on a plate of glass that resembles a see-saw or a laptop - a feat that would be physiologically impossible for a human being. Born in Georgia, Andro Wekua has worked internationally as an artist since the middle of the millennium's first decade. He moved to Europe after the unrest in Abkhazia in the 1990s. In addition to sculptures and installations, Andro Weka works with paintings, video and collage art.

Result #1

Untitled creates a space of psychological tension. The girl hanging in the air is almost like a living human being, but at the same time unreal and cyborg-like. Cyborgs are humans or animals with an electronic device or part thereof integrated. In principle, a human with a pacemaker meets the definition of the cyborg. The sleeping figure - or, in computer terms, the character in standby mode - is surrounded by empty, sterile space that highlights the distance of the viewer. The girl's body weight is on her chin, which rests on a plate of glass that resembles a see-saw or a laptop - a feat that would be physiologically impossible for a human being. Born in Georgia, Andro Wekua has worked internationally as an artist since the middle of the millennium's first decade. He moved to Europe after the unrest in Abkhazia in the 1990s. In addition to sculptures and installations, Andro Weka works with paintings, video and collage art. <|startoftext|>José Parlá, a Spanish artist who lives in Paris, has been exhibiting in Spain since the mid-90s. His work has often been influenced by art that was produced in the former Portuguese colony, such as that of Perú. But the work also addresses a number of other sources, such as the architecture of Casa del Campo in Santiago de Compostela, in Madrid, and the role of color in the history of modernism.José Parlá has been exhibiting in France since 1997. His work is often based on the idea of the living room, the gallery, or the garden. The artists most recent exhibition consisted of five large-scale, black-and-white photographs. The images were taken in the garden of the artists family home in the small town of Vallecas. The photographs, taken in the artists fathers garden, are of a very intimate nature. The subject of each picture is the artist himself, who is seen from the waist up, wearing a green long-sleeved shirt and a black tie. The photos are almost exclusively of the artists own family, but a few also include his wife, who is dressed in a pink suit. The images are thus intimate and self-conscious, but also very revealing, with their allusions to the history of photography.José Parlás works with a variety of images and techniques. He uses both the photographic and the painted one. The images are often abstract, and are often crudely painted. The paintings are also often crudely painted. The portraits are a reference to the artists life as a Spaniard, and a reflection on the death of his father in 2008. The collages are made of photographs taken by the artist himself. The collages are also made of photographs, and are, in fact, self-portraits.

Result #2

Untitled creates a space of psychological tension. The girl hanging in the air is almost like a living human being, but at the same time unreal and cyborg-like. Cyborgs are humans or animals with an electronic device or part thereof integrated. In principle, a human with a pacemaker meets the definition of the cyborg. The sleeping figure - or, in computer terms, the character in standby mode - is surrounded by empty, sterile space that highlights the distance of the viewer. The girl's body weight is on her chin, which rests on a plate of glass that resembles a see-saw or a laptop - a feat that would be physiologically impossible for a human being. Born in Georgia, Andro Wekua has worked internationally as an artist since the middle of the millennium's first decade. He moved to Europe after the unrest in Abkhazia in the 1990s. In addition to sculptures and installations, Andro Weka works with paintings, video and collage art. Wekua's paintings are very different from the paintings of his colleagues, and they are even more different from the collages Weka has made for the past ten years. The collages, which are also paintings, have been the most successful part of the exhibition, although they were not the most interesting. The collages, which consist of found images and texts, were the most apparent weakness. The collage in particular seemed to be an attempt to make the art of the 80s more contemporary, and it failed. The collages, which, like the paintings, are paintings, are also the most obvious source of inspiration for the collages. The collage is, of course, a composition, and the collages are not only collages. The collage is not only a collage, it is a collage. And the collage is not a collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage of collage is not a collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage. The collage is a collage of collage, the collage of collage.

Result #3

The exhibition Spolita: Spolia, 2009–10, which was curated by Omer Fasts and the artists themselves, brought together ten of the artists work in the late-twentieth century, from the past four decades. The show was organized into two groups, each of which presented a selection of the artists own pieces in a museum or gallery. The group of artists who came from the United States was made up of artists who live in New York, and their work has been shown in the United States, such as the artist Ronald Jones, who has been a resident artist at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York since 1992. The group includes artists such as Michael Van den Bergh, Thomas Struth, and Jack Pierson. They have shown in Europe as well, including at the New Museum, and the New York Times, where they are represented by their work in the autumn of 2010, in the series The Locus of Memory. This show is the first in the US, and it is a fitting one. The artists from the US have, in the past, been among the first to receive the respect they deserve in Europe, and it is a good idea to take this opportunity to celebrate this fact. The show is a pleasure to behold, and a pleasure to learn that the art of these artists is so close to the heart of the European tradition.

Result #4

Untitled creates a space of psychological tension. The girl hanging in the air is almost like a living human being, but at the same time unreal and cyborg-like. Cyborgs are humans or animals with an electronic device or part thereof integrated. In principle, a human with a pacemaker meets the definition of the cyborg. The sleeping figure - or, in computer terms, the character in standby mode - is surrounded by empty, sterile space that highlights the distance of the viewer. The girl's body weight is on her chin, which rests on a plate of glass that resembles a see-saw or a laptop - a feat that would be physiologically impossible for a human being. Born in Georgia, Andro Wekua has worked internationally as an artist since the middle of the millennium's first decade. He moved to Europe after the unrest in Abkhazia in the 1990s. In addition to sculptures and installations, Andro Weka works with paintings, video and collage art. He also makes drawings, and they are on display in the gallery. They are, in fact, the results of his drawings. They are also the results of his writing. In the drawings, the artist has used the names of other artists, such as a horse-riding character and a character from an old novel by Tomoe Tanaka. In the collages, he has used images of other artists, such as a painting by Andro Weka, and of a third-world artist, a drawing by Andro Weka by the same artist. The latter is a rather heavy-handed reference to the original, but it is a rather heavy-handed one. The drawings are, on the other hand, not so heavy-handed; they are rather light and playful. In the collages, the artist has used a similar technique, but in a different way. In one of the collages, the artist has used the idea of the collage. The collages, which are made of paper and ink, are arranged in a kind of complex, overlapping, and intersecting pattern. The collages are thus not only an extension of the drawings, but also a reference to Andro Weka himself.The drawings in the show are also the results of drawings. They are not in the usual way, however, but are made with a brush that is not a brush, and the result is a kind of drawing, which, in turn, is a drawing. The drawings are made by means of a technique that is not a brush, which is to say, a technique that is a technique. The drawings are thus not just drawings, but a kind of photographic process. They are, in fact, not made by a brush but by a brush that is not a brush. The brushes are not even on the canvas, which is to say that the brush is not used in the same way that the canvas is.

Result #5

Untitled creates a space of psychological tension. The girl hanging in the air is almost like a living human being, but at the same time unreal and cyborg-like. Cyborgs are humans or animals with an electronic device or part thereof integrated. In principle, a human with a pacemaker meets the definition of the cyborg. The sleeping figure - or, in computer terms, the character in standby mode - is surrounded by empty, sterile space that highlights the distance of the viewer. The girl's body weight is on her chin, which rests on a plate of glass that resembles a see-saw or a laptop - a feat that would be physiologically impossible for a human being. Born in Georgia, Andro Wekua has worked internationally as an artist since the middle of the millennium's first decade. He moved to Europe after the unrest in Abkhazia in the 1990s. In addition to sculptures and installations, Andro Weka works with paintings, video and collage art. The artist's name is not particularly significant, but the title of the exhibition, Die Urchinsame (The One), clearly points to the fact that the artist's work is at once organic and artificial. In his recent paintings, Weka applies a special kind of acrylic paint to his own body, using it to create new body parts, such as the nose, the eye, the eye's surface, and the back. The result is a variety of bodies, all of them with a kind of animal-like presence. These creatures appear in the artists works as emblems, and, in the process of being emblems, they become organic. In this way, Weka's works are not only about the body, but also about the body of the viewer. They are about the body, but also about the body of the painting, which is always the body of the canvas. The artist's body is always present in the paintings, and it is always present in the artists paintings: a nude, a teddy bear, a halo, a fish, a guitar, a hammer, a whip, a rifle, and so on. The body is the essence of the work, a fundamental and necessary part of the process of painting.The exhibition's title, Die Urchinsame (The One), is taken from the German word for painting, Urchinsame (all works 2000), and the artist's name, which means a number of things, from the Greek root to the German word, is a pun on the German word, urchinsame. The word painting implies a number of things, from the body to the canvas to the painter's hand. The Latin word painting is a pun on the Latin word painting, which means both the body and the canvas. In other words, painting implies a number of things that are not quite things—not quite bodies, not quite images, not quite things in the usual sense of the word.

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