a post-apocalyptic immersive art experience, with upcycled materials, textiles, headdresses, shrines, relics of old, tarot of the wastes, original costuming, guardians of cimotA, radioactive mushroom sculptures, cimotA's hovel

Result #1

a post-apocalyptic immersive art experience, with upcycled materials, textiles, headdresses, shrines, relics of old, tarot of the wastes, original costuming, guardians of cimotA, radioactive mushroom sculptures, cimotA's hoveled workers, a female artist, and a handful of children. In the gallery's small back room, the assembled materials, including a pile of broken-down rubble, were juxtaposed with the rusted-out rusted-out rusted-out rusted-out, a wooden building that had been knocked over and that still lay on the ground. The works were made from the same materials that were found in the rubble pile, but these were also made from the same materials that had been used to make the rubble pile. In this sense, the work was both literal and metaphoric, a deconstruction of the material world, an exploration of the post-industrial landscape, and a celebration of the cultural and artistic heritage of an industrial landscape.The works are all drawn from a large library of texts, the vast majority of which were written by the artist. In the same way that we read texts on the street, we read texts on a book. In this way, the pieces are simultaneously both images of the world and signs of the world, as well as a reminder of the importance of literacy and the need for a cultural sense of connection between people. The installation's title, In the land of the dark, is a reference to the contemporary art world: The title is a phrase taken from an article by Daniel Buren, a critic of the artists work. It is also a reference to Buren's own work, which has been characterized as an art of the vernacular, of the little or no, that, as a kind of modernist vernacular, is indifferent to the significance of content, and, in this respect, it is the contemporary vernacular that has been the most important part of contemporary art since its inception in the late 60s.

Result #2

a post-apocalyptic immersive art experience, with upcycled materials, textiles, headdresses, shrines, relics of old, tarot of the wastes, original costuming, guardians of cimotA, radioactive mushroom sculptures, cimotA's hovel-like stables, and a space-age futon.The exhibition was organized by Lothar Baum (curator) and Ulrich Schütte (artist), and includes some of the artists' most recent works as well as a few early pieces. Baum's overview of the current scene is a refreshing one, and while he is undoubtedly the most well-known of the group, his works are among the most engaging. His use of printed materials—for instance, a photograph of a painted plaster heart on a canvas—seems to take its cue from the ironic distance of his earlier pieces. But Baum's work also has a playful, organic quality, as in his wall-mounted pieces, which are made of concrete and other materials. The most successful of these pieces are made of materials such as moss and dirt, as in Siederts Welt (Seed, 1984), a grassy mound of dirt that grows to fill a large, square gallery space. It was an interesting but somewhat awkward arrangement, and one that made the space feel more like a natural place of rest than a laboratory.The artist's work is the most complex in this show. Its reception is critical. It is important to note that Baum's work is often more conceptual than artistic, and that it is best seen in a context of ambiguity. It is also important to note that this show has been presented in two different ways: in the gallerys main space, which features a variety of works, and in a small back room, which contains a small number of original works. The latter show, on the other hand, is almost a retrospective, with works and pieces from the early 80s and early 90s. Baum's works and his oeuvre are presented in a reasonably systematic fashion. The show's title is meant to evoke the idea of context, and in this respect Baum's work is closely linked to the work of his peers.

Result #3

a post-apocalyptic immersive art experience, with upcycled materials, textiles, headdresses, shrines, relics of old, tarot of the wastes, original costuming, guardians of cimotA, radioactive mushroom sculptures, cimotA's hovels, and cimotA's ashes. These works were installed on the gallery floor, but on top of this environment were a few freestanding tables, as if the artists had organized the tables and placed them in a virtual room. On top of the table was a cimotA's head, which was slightly bent over its base, its mouth agape in shock and fear. Its eyes and nose were painted with the words blunter and less suspicious. On the table, along with the cimotA's ashes, lay a copy of the book that the artist had made about the Holocaust. The table was empty. The book was the artists, the pages of it, the ashes of the artist.The exhibition was divided into three parts. The first part consisted of a video installation, a little theatre, and a series of sculptures. The stage was a large empty room, with a low, vertical platform. The platform was covered with a white cloth and was hung with a table, a cimotA's ashes, and a copy of a book on the Holocaust. The video showed the artist in front of a wooden-screen screen. The camera was fixed on her head, but she was seen walking around the platform, where she was surrounded by a group of cimotA's ashes. The video showed the artist's face, her face covered by a white cloth, but she was shown standing before a blank screen. The video showed the cimotA's ashes, their heads covered by the white cloth, but they were also shown on a screen. The video showed the cimotA's ashes, their heads covered by a cloth. The ashes were the cimotA's, and the cimotA's ashes were the cimotA's.

Result #4

a post-apocalyptic immersive art experience, with upcycled materials, textiles, headdresses, shrines, relics of old, tarot of the wastes, original costuming, guardians of cimotA, radioactive mushroom sculptures, cimotA's hovel-like forms, and a selection of music and recordings. The most striking work in the show was a work called S.O.S.S.A. (Sick Onion). This piece consists of a stuffed-to-bursting, live-animal-size, twisted-up-in-the-ass, fat-toothed, oversized-ass, protruding, well-proportioned, and raven-haired, sickly-looking, sickly-looking, and kind of dead, with a large, hulking, grotesque head. The head is covered with a flaxen-smeared, poppily-colored, sticky-sweet, and sticky-sweet, wet-orange, amorphous-looking, and sticky-sweet, wet-orange, and is covered with a bright-orange, puffy-pink, and yellowish-orange, amorphous-looking, and yellowish-orange, and a jumble of other, more or less natural, materials, including bone, straw, and plaster. The head is a huge, twitching, half-animal-half-bug, and is covered with a smocky, trapezoidal, flesh-colored, and thigh-high, monster-hued, puffy-pink, and mushroom-colored, amorphous-looking, and sticky-sweet, and sticky-sweet, and amorphous-looking, and is covered with a warm, yellowish-orange, and a pinkish-orange, and a little blue, and a large, amorphous-looking, and a kind of pinkish-orange, and a little greenish-orange, and a yellowish-orange, and a yellowish-orange, and a lot of yellow and a lot of orange. The head is covered with a brownish-orange, and is covered with a spatter of mud.

Result #5

s, and an air freshener's wardrobe. After all, we can already smell the gas. If the presence of the garden is a comforting presence, its not a comforting presence, but a strange, alien one. There's a point in the garden's life that it might well have to go on. When you walk through the door and you see it, it's still there, waiting for you, its seed, seedling, and leaves. The garden's life is alive.Translated from Italian by Marguerite Shore.

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