Product safety is an imperative. As a company we have to manage the risk of selling defective products that may result in injury to consumers or impair our image. To mitigate this risk, we have company-wide product safety policies in place that ensure we consistently apply physical and chemical product safety and conformity standards.

Result #1

Product safety is an imperative. As a company we have to manage the risk of selling defective products that may result in injury to consumers or impair our image. To mitigate this risk, we have company-wide product safety policies in place that ensure we consistently apply physical and chemical product safety and conformity standards. <|startoftext|>Kara Walker, now based in the Bay Area, has a reputation for elegant conceptual works. In this group of acrylic paintings, the primary motif is a multicolored blanket. One layer is acrylic, another is oil, and the third layer is a flat white substrate. The painting itself is made of super-absorbent acrylic, with other materials ranging from pigment to silk and tar to paper, clay, paper, wax, and a paintbrush.Walking is the familiar sign of A. D. as the archetype, but it doesnt always translate into high-level formalism. Walkers multi-material, multisensory paintings reveal complex and often surprising relations between various materials, creating a diverse and fascinating sense of structure. In The Rembrandt Cycle, 1994, for example, a white cloth rests upon a deeply painted black one; the works complexity of surface is the result of the process of arranging the textile on the canvas. The intention of the brush-strokes—which are made of hot lead—is to resemble a gray-blue surface. In my mind, Walker is referring to both a human hand and a colored brush, and she was interested in the tradition of Japanese painting and Japanese craft.The inclusion of lead in this work suggests that the artist is borrowing from the importance of the hand to paint, but the resemblance is almost certainly illusionary, and Walker may be using lead as a palette for reflecting light, while the red substance suggests a certain heaviness. In The Garden of Delights, 1994, a large cluster of painted-on-white paper supports a pile of flowers; the cluster, which is somehow reminiscent of a cascade, is created by a series of meticulously-painted linear cutouts of variously patterned fabrics.

Result #2

Product safety is an imperative. As a company we have to manage the risk of selling defective products that may result in injury to consumers or impair our image. To mitigate this risk, we have company-wide product safety policies in place that ensure we consistently apply physical and chemical product safety and conformity standards. <|startoftext|>The History of the Van Vliets (Self-Taught Artists) is a major retrospective of work by 25 of the self-taught artists from Switzerland. An enormous amount of scholarly and critical material from the 50s and 60s was gathered. More than one hundred examples of the art of the 40s and 50s have been carefully preserved in the Van Vliets collection, in an attempt to disassociate the art from social or political issues. In spite of this fact, the exhibition constitutes a very worthwhile endeavor. The archival material is sometimes confusing and lacking in many cases, but nevertheless creates a very interesting and satisfying background for the artists themselves.It is not a small matter that the Van Vliets, as the work of this group demonstrates, have been in limbo for some years now. The exhibition was organized by a panel of eminent historians, as the title of the exhibition suggests, and assembled by the director of the Museum Ludwig, Elmgreen and Eliel Ullrich. The basic premise of the exhibition is that Van Vliets art, like many in modern art, reflected a strong and active relationship to the young art scene of the Swiss town of Lausanne. This relationship was manifested in the importance placed upon the artist and his work, and in the encyclopedic well-reasoned catalogs carefully prepared by Van Vliets friends and colleagues. The Van Vliets belonged to a truly international group of artists. And despite the fact that they are regarded as one of the most important avant-garde Swiss artists, their work remains rather mysterious. The general public has only had limited access to this material. However, as a further attempt to reassess and to show the artists work, the exhibition is now being circulated in an open catalogue which can be consulted from any visitor.The historical development of Van Vliets is interesting and instructive.

Result #3

Product safety is an imperative. As a company we have to manage the risk of selling defective products that may result in injury to consumers or impair our image. To mitigate this risk, we have company-wide product safety policies in place that ensure we consistently apply physical and chemical product safety and conformity standards. <|startoftext|>While the image of a faceless concrete figure in a macabre glow-worm-studded skin filled with cryptic overtones is one of the modern classics, its an image that finds a variety of forms in many cultures and contexts. The grotesque, the perverse, the ridiculous, the erotic, the phallic, the self-inflicted, the sacred, the ecstatic, the cosmological, the phallus, the carnal, and the sumi. Its also a pretty image, an image of the sublime, of the body and the transcendence of all forms of the soul. Its not the obscenity of death, its more the blood of the soul, a rich and mysterious humanity of the senses. And there is a creepy bit of visual-verbal humor in this image, as well as a certain poignancy in the fact that in the gothic world of yesterday it was thought to be repulsive and desirable. Not so in the age of modernity.Criminalized yet scarred, a form of flesh that will forever age as it ages, it seems the sun has now set. Now there is a kind of fruit of the tree, not the same as an apple, but rather a kind of soul-game, and it has become part of a familiar image of paradise, a garden of pleasures. The fruits of the tree, of the garden, that Henry Gale would write in his 1925 story The Sculptor, are of the same nature as the eyes. They also function as a metaphor for the soul, the ego, as in the starry sky that glows like a mazelike building. Because of the iconography of Eden, the fruit represents innocence, and because it is always in the form of a serpent, it is also a symbol of violence. A serpent as the Virgin Marys veil.

Result #4

Product safety is an imperative. As a company we have to manage the risk of selling defective products that may result in injury to consumers or impair our image. To mitigate this risk, we have company-wide product safety policies in place that ensure we consistently apply physical and chemical product safety and conformity standards. <|startoftext|>For decades, the words power, form, and power in photography have functioned like string and string to a particular kind of object. The color black, white, and gray have come to refer to a certain kind of photographic object, as have the word electronic, a rarely used term in the 70s. Yet, as a form of photographic fact, it has been useful to the majority of photographers in contemporary culture, not least in the preservation of urban artifacts. This is why Black and White & Blue was a timely exhibition, not only because it showed the work of a few photographers, but also because it brought the specter of Richard Prince, who is one of the most visible social and political activists in America today.Photographed graffiti and other graffiti are typically found on the streets of major American cities. Their presence as evidence of political acts is sometimes interpreted as evidence of their illegality. We might view these signs as a violation of the rights of protesters, thus jeopardizing the political intention of which the sign is made. Prince takes this illegality to a whole other level, taking a second, less accepted view. In his photographs, he keeps the individual signs of street culture alive and vital, as in a fight against racism. So far this exhibition did not include any photographs of street actions or of police confrontations, but it did include photographs of Prince himself—his own photographically distorted face and those of his alter ego, Prince. Prince is a character who wears himself out trying to paint; and who pretends, with the full artistic skill of an accomplished draftsman, to be a perfect contemporary figure.In one photograph, Prince poses with two rollerskirts (cleverly stenciled in black paint), each in a different color. They are painted a bit thinner than the others; one is white and the other yellow. They look ready to fight, but are lost in their own tangled seriousness of purpose.

Result #5

Product safety is an imperative. As a company we have to manage the risk of selling defective products that may result in injury to consumers or impair our image. To mitigate this risk, we have company-wide product safety policies in place that ensure we consistently apply physical and chemical product safety and conformity standards. <|startoftext|>Norman Zammitt, The Iceberg (Black), 1963–65, cast lead, water, 13 1/2 x 5 1/4 x 3 3/4". © Estate of Norman Zammitt/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Norman Zammitts extraordinary body of work has only recently begun to receive the attention it deserves. The first major survey exhibition of this sculptor's work ever took place in this country, at the New Museum in 1976, which opened in the space and time of John the Baptists victory at the Second Amendment in Connecticut over the state legislature and led to the passage of the Firearms Owners Protection Act, which prohibited the possession of handguns in private establishments. The exhibit began in earnest the following year with Norman Zammitt: Between War and Peace, Part Two, at the New Museum, which was followed by a more general survey devoted to Zammitt's early works, which included examples of his pieces from the 1960s through the 80s. For this third New Museum retrospective, curator Helen Molesworth presented the full suite of the artists work, plus a handful of late-period pieces, in an easily accessible, carefully curated display and three chronologically related compendia-like wall displays. The exhibition thus provided a substantial opportunity to discern the diverse forces shaping the sculptors oeuvre, from his social and political activism to his art-historical production to his relationship with his art-world peers.The show was divided into three separate parts, at the top of which were slides from Zammitt's notebooks taken during his trip to China in 1968 and a chronological survey of works made between 1966 and 1969. The notebooks provide crucial evidence that by the 70s, the New York–born, Los Angeles–based sculptor was strongly influenced by artists such as Robert Morris and Mark di Suvero.

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