political issue of bots where do these images come from? programming autonomy anthropology of images human weighing-artificial intelligence blend divergence x personality newsstand flow break immediate seizure what these images say about us banking as an instrument to inform "reality" gallery file atlas mnemosine infinite images newspaper, magazine, poster, booklet (publication media) we influence the "aesthetics" of bots or bots influence us

Result #1

political issue of bots where do these images come from? programming autonomy anthropology of images human weighing-artificial intelligence blend divergence x personality newsstand flow break immediate seizure what these images say about us banking as an instrument to inform "reality" gallery file atlas mnemosine infinite images newspaper, magazine, poster, booklet (publication media) we influence the "aesthetics" of bots or bots influence us to act as the digital equivalent of the media, and we are used to being manipulated. The point of the photo-text-print-art installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Glyn-Margaret/Artforum, Los Angeles, October 24, 2000, is that we can, in the name of our humanist values and our democratic commitment to a more open society, act as agents of social change. The idea is to create a dialogue between computer images and human texts, and to do so through an interactive process of exchange between bot and viewer. The series of large-scale photographs, printed in black-and-white and enlarged, shows the artists live-streaming conversation with bots, and a number of these images have been added to the show. This is the work of a bot, which, like the human, is an agent of change.The video and photographic works, and the video installation, which was also part of the show, are made up of various types of text. The images are taken from the Internet and include texts such as A man named I.O. (the bot) talks about his life and his relationship to other bots. A woman named I.O. talks about her own relationship with bots, and a number of these images are printed on stickers that are placed on walls in the gallery. The video installation, which consists of a succession of black-and-white images of two bots—one speaking, the other pretending to—was created by a bot created by another artist. The video installation, with its random juxtapositions of the two bots, is an example of the chaos in which we are involved, and of the Internet as a whole.This chaos is the point of the video installation. In the video, we see the artist and bot as both the subject and the object of our attention, and we are not sure which is which.

Result #2

political issue of bots where do these images come from? programming autonomy anthropology of images human weighing-artificial intelligence blend divergence x personality newsstand flow break immediate seizure what these images say about us banking as an instrument to inform "reality" gallery file atlas mnemosine infinite images newspaper, magazine, poster, booklet (publication media) we influence the "aesthetics" of bots or bots influence us by playing with the terms of the media, the art of the digital age, and the art of technology (read: our own technological self-determination). In these works, one finds the tools of cultural interaction, the vectors of surveillance, and the ways in which bots are increasingly transformed into agents of power and control. The work of such artists as Sven Lütticken, Sam Lewitt, and Zdenek Zilberman evokes a sense of social engagement and the suspension of the law, and it is not so far-fetched to say that these artists are pushing the limits of media and technology to create a new, more political kind of artistic production. But it is also true that the work of these artists has always been political in the sense that its circulation is political, and it is the circulation of art that is political.The exhibition was divided into two parts, the first of which consisted of a series of photographs of the artist playing with the media, in which the bots can be seen as virtual media agents. The second part, in the gallery, was a group of small-format photographs and a video, which was also organized around the use of bots. In the video, Lütticken says: Ive never been able to play the media, because the bots were always playing. The bots are now playing, but only to show the power and intelligence of the artist. The video shows a sort of dance with the bots, in which Lütticken is seen dancing with them, and one can imagine that this kind of work, which often involves the simultaneous circulation of art and the media, will continue to be considered as political, if not as art.The exhibition was also divided into two rooms, one devoted to the manipulation of the media and one to the manipulation of the images, and one was devoted to the manipulation of the bots.

Result #3

political issue of bots where do these images come from? programming autonomy anthropology of images human weighing-artificial intelligence blend divergence x personality newsstand flow break immediate seizure what these images say about us banking as an instrument to inform "reality" gallery file atlas mnemosine infinite images newspaper, magazine, poster, booklet (publication media) we influence the "aesthetics" of bots or bots influence us as we become aware of our own images. The result is a feedback loop of experience, a feedback loop of knowledge, and a feedback loop of (as in the case of art) a convergence of information.The "images" of art, of the artwork, are now increasingly becoming, according to the artist, the only representation of the world. What is striking is how this recognition of the new reality of the artwork is being made. The artist is trying to find a way to show the world the art it needs to be, but he has to give it a form. The artist cannot do this simply by creating new images. The artist must make them into something tangible. They must be tangible, and that is what the artist does. The artist must produce images that are so tangible that they can be seen by anyone. In this sense, the artist is creating a kind of visual art.The artist, in creating images, creates a world of the mind, a realm of the imagination. This is the realm of the artist, who creates the images that are art. The artist creates images so that the world becomes a part of the artists imagination. This is the realm of the artist who makes the images. The artist is creating a world of images that are art. The world of images is already a world of art. The artist creates images so that the world becomes part of the artist, who makes the images. The artist creates images so that the world becomes part of the artist who creates the images. The artist creates images so that the world becomes part of the artist who creates the images. The artist creates images so that the world becomes part of the artist who creates the images. The world of images is already a world of art. The world of images is already a world of art.The artist creates images so that the world becomes part of the artist who creates the images. The world of images is already a world of art.

Result #4

political issue of bots where do these images come from? programming autonomy anthropology of images human weighing-artificial intelligence blend divergence x personality newsstand flow break immediate seizure what these images say about us banking as an instrument to inform "reality" gallery file atlas mnemosine infinite images newspaper, magazine, poster, booklet (publication media) we influence the "aesthetics" of bots or bots influence us as they influence the current art, and art becomes art.We have been taught to think of the computer as an instrumental part of the art world, but in the absence of such a monolithic example, its been hard to locate the place where the human-machine interface would meet the computer. This exhibition suggested that the computer—as the central software of the digital age—is now as much a part of art as it ever was.The show included the computer-generated versions of more than two hundred works from the past decade, including paintings, sculpture, installations, photographs, and films. This selection was made up of works by artists and computer scientists as well as by artists and artists who have used the computer as a tool to develop their own. The computer-generated images and sculptures of the late 1960s and early 70s, often called computer-generated images, are a product of the twentieth century. They are a synthesis of popular art and computer technology, in which the human hand is no longer present, but the machine is. The exhibition was divided into three sections. The first section was devoted to the computer-generated images of the first world, showing the future of the machine, and, to a lesser extent, of the machine as a tool of the future. This section showed us how computer technology is transforming our perception of the past and our understanding of the future. The work of the artists of the early 70s and 80s included computer-generated images of the first world, and of the world as seen by artists working in the field of art.The second section showed us how the computer is transforming the relationship between artists and machines, as well as of artists and computer scientists. The computer is not a tool to predict the future; it is a tool to transform our perception of the past and our understanding of the future.

Result #5

political issue of bots where do these images come from? programming autonomy anthropology of images human weighing-artificial intelligence blend divergence x personality newsstand flow break immediate seizure what these images say about us banking as an instrument to inform "reality" gallery file atlas mnemosine infinite images newspaper, magazine, poster, booklet (publication media) we influence the "aesthetics" of bots or bots influence us to have an awareness of the power of their images, the power of their intentions, and the power of their intentions as well as the power of our own. Atlas mnemosine is a kind of map of the world. It is a world that has been mediated by technology, but which is still raw and unexplored. It is a world in which we are still discovering new ways to create a world of information, one that has not yet become a digital world, but has never been replaced by one.Atlas mnemosine is not a series of images but a series of works, each of which is a map of the world. The work is constructed around a video, a video which shows an aerial view of the world. The video is in a German-English mix of English and German. The translation of the aerial view is a fragment of the voice of a bot that is programmed to imitate the words spoken by the bot. The bot is a powerful one, but it is also a human being, and we have to accept that it is not a machine. The video depicts the world in a series of brief moments, interrupted by various random, out of order, and often disturbing events. These events are often the result of a bot-controlled collision between two worlds. The collision between the two worlds is mediated by the bots speech, which is often incomprehensible. The collision is always mediated by the bots control of the image; it is always mediated by human intervention, by the video, by the artist, by the audience. Atlas mnemosine is not a documentary of the world, but rather an attempt to create a world where the human and the bot can communicate. The human and the bot are in conflict with one another, and as a result the world is constantly disrupted.Atlas mnemosine is a work of art that is both a map of the world and a map of human interaction.

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