Orange was not the best choice of colors.

Result #1

The best pieces in the show were the bright colors of the artist himself, which are easy to read but difficult to take in all of its details. The color is too bright, and the forms are too obtrusive to be convincing.The most interesting work in the show was an untitled piece. A white piece of wood, painted white, sits on a black wooden base. The base is covered with a transparent plastic wrap; a small round mirror sits at the top. The work is a beautiful piece of craftsmanship, but one that is obviously just a little too much. The piece is an attempt at a modern-day minimalism, a style that is too facile in its attempt to be profound. The work is not a particularly beautiful piece of sculpture, nor is it particularly sensuous, and the work is simply too easy on the eyes to be effective. It is a very clever and difficult piece of work, but one that is too simple and too successful. In this piece, the mirror is not as effective as it should be, but it is still effective as a subtle symbol, a symbol that has a particular meaning for the individual.

Result #2

Orange was not the best choice of colors. The odd colors seemed to be a result of the fact that the most successful ones were those in which the colors were most interesting and, in the end, the most difficult to decipher. But a large part of the problem can be traced to the fact that the viewer is faced with a very large number of very dark, very ugly colors. They are all very close in value to the black of the paper, and the color seems to be determined by a logic of a strictly combinative sort. The canvas itself is obviously a very high value, and even if the colors were softer, the canvas would be too dense to hold the colors. The problem is compounded by the fact that the colors are all very close in value to the black of the paper, and the color seems to be determined by a logic of a strictly combinative sort. The canvas itself is obviously a very high value, and even if the colors were softer, the canvas would be too dense to hold the colors. The problem is compounded by the fact that the colors are all very close in value to the black of the paper, and the color seems to be determined by a logic of a strictly combinative sort. The canvas itself is obviously a very high value, and even if the colors were softer, the canvas would be too dense to hold the colors. The problem is compounded by the fact that the colors are all very close in value to the black of the paper, and the color seems to be determined by a logic of a strictly combinative sort. The canvas itself is obviously a very high value, and even if the colors were softer, the canvas would be too dense to hold the colors. The problem is compounded by the fact that the colors are all very close in value to the black of the paper, and the color seems to be determined by a logic of a strictly combinative sort.

Result #3

Orange was not the best choice of colors. The placement of the objects in the gallery—in the middle of the room, with the windows down—felt arbitrary and, as a result, the light behind the objects was hardly illuminating. In fact, the light that was projected onto the objects was only partially visible through the glass. The resulting impression was that the objects were viewed from the side and could be seen from the front, and that the view through the glass was seen through the glass. This was also true of the installation, in which the objects were placed in a series of six-foot-high plastic-bottomed windows. The glass was divided into four sections, which were lined up along a long, narrow side of the wall, where the viewer could look through the glass. This orientation is typical of the installation; the glass is almost always broken and is covered with water. The water itself is a natural substance, and the water is a liquid, but the water is always frozen. The objects—a chair, a book, a plate, a pair of shoes—were placed against the glass and were viewed through the glass; they were thus submerged, and therefore not visible. The water, which was frozen, was thus the only element that remained visible. The objects were therefore made to function as signs of their own disappearance, and their existence only through the glass. This was a way of making visible the materiality of the objects and their relationship to the world. The water also served to mark the objects against the wall, and this function was complemented by the fact that the objects were placed on the floor, so that they appeared to be floating. The water also provided a metaphor for the materials, which were often found in plain view. The water was a metaphor for the material, and the objects were made to float, to become a metaphor for the immaterial. The water was also a metaphor for the self, since the objects were placed on top of the water.

Result #4

It didnt seem to fit the spirit of the installation. It wasnt the most natural color, nor was it the most appropriate color for the location. In a couple of the photos, the colors looked like they were made for the paper, and the colors didnt really add up to the actual colors of the paper. But they did add up to the color of the paper, and in one case, the paper was yellow and green, and in another, the paper was white and black. This is the best shot Ive seen of the artist, but in a couple of the other pictures, the color seemed to be a little too much, and the paper was even yellow.In the end, I didnt see the show very much, and I dont mean that it was bad. It was a good show, but it didnt come off as well as the other works Ive seen. I think the point is that the show was a little out of control, and I dont like that.

Result #5

In the end, there was no real agreement. But, as a group, the works were clearly an ensemble of some of the best in the show.

©2021 Lucidbeaming