the work reflects on Hungary's neoliberal turn and the . ethno-nationalism and autocracy undermining the lack of environmental and social policy

Result #1

the work reflects on Hungary's neoliberal turn and the . ethno-nationalism and autocracy undermining the lack of environmental and social policy . . . and the inability of the public to become the locus of knowledge and awareness. The exhibition, curated by João Ribas, is a kind of catalog of the artists current work.

Result #2

the work reflects on Hungary's neoliberal turn and the . ethno-nationalism and autocracy undermining the lack of environmental and social policy vernacular. The show's title, Our Earth, Your Water, Your Land, was taken from a line from the 1961 song Green River by the rock band Fugazi, which had a moment of political resonance when, in the late 1960s, the anti-fascist organization, the Black Panthers, carried an anti-imperialist banner past the U.S.-Mexico border fence. It is a fitting reminder that the same kinds of politics can be found in the everyday.The exhibition included photographs, a drawing, and a video. Its aim was to produce a public dialogue that would engage a broad public—the art world, the public, and the gallery itself—through a discussion of water, land, and water. The video, which was shown with a selection of the artists' work from the series El Diario (The River), 2010–, and El Diario del Urgentan (The River), 2010–, was a follow-up to the artists' first solo exhibition in Mexico, which was held at the Bandera Museum in Mexico City in 2007. The video, which was installed in the gallerys front room, represents an attempt to explore the intersections between the images, sounds, and gestures of the artists' native Mexico and the modern Western world. The video begins with footage of a group of young women playing instruments and singing along to the group's music. Then we see a group of men walking through a city, talking on cell phones and eating chips. We see two people in suits talking about a group of artists who are part of the Black Panthers movement in Mexico. The women's voices are distorted, so that the men's voices are distorted as well. They speak in a style of Spanish-language radio and Spanish-language spoken-word films, and one of the men sings a song. The video shows how the artist's Mexicanness creates a space for an encounter between the two groups of men.

Result #3

the work reflects on Hungary's neoliberal turn and the . ethno-nationalism and autocracy undermining the lack of environmental and social policy vernacular in the West, the art of the 60s and 70s is often referred to as nihilist. In the wake of the collapse of the old Soviet regime, many artists responded with an aggressive nihilism, displaying an allegiance to the ideals of the revolutionary past. In the art of the 80s, however, nihilism has been replaced by a more reflective, critical approach. In a series of installations by the late artist Mircea Cantor, the nihilism of the earlier work has been replaced by a critical engagement with the very premise of the work.Cantors work examines the history of the Enlightenment through a critique of its legitimation, and, in doing so, foregrounds the contemporary condition. The exhibition begins with the installation Elemento della pittura, 1985–86, in which Cantor installed a large number of books—her own collection of nineteenth-century texts—on a small platform. This work contains a dense and text-heavy text, which Cantor has used to reflect on the use of texts as signs of the power of a society. Next to the platform, she placed a large copy of a seventeenth-century poem by John Cage, which Cantor read aloud. In this work, Cantor made use of the poets stylistic vocabulary, and she addressed the condition of the world, both real and imagined, in which she is involved. The poem's message of the transience of all things and the fragility of all things was echoed in the work's title, Elemento della pittura.In the next room, Lavoro (Lavor, 1987), a kind of manifesto, was presented in a cardboard box. The message consisted of a small black-and-white photograph of a young man, who was covered in a large coat and wearing a mask. In the photograph, the mask was the one on the mans head, and he seemed to be looking at the masked figure.

Result #4

the work reflects on Hungary's neoliberal turn and the . ethno-nationalism and autocracy undermining the lack of environmental and social policy vernacular in the West. For her recent exhibition, The End of the World as Seen on Earth, the artist took up the subject with a fierce and satirical touch. In a series of drawings, an eye-popping array of symbols, written words, and images, Rina Banerjees had photographed the Earth, showing it to be a scene of stark violence and despair. The artist then cast these images as the image of the end of the world. By dispelling the world and its symbols, she has managed to create a new world in which the human race is no longer the center of attention. The images range from a giant earth-tonic to a crucifix to a bear with its tail. The drawings in fact serve as an invitation to the viewer to interact with the work, which, by creating a new world in which the human race is no longer the center of attention, is both a metaphor and a declaration of intent.The show was divided into two parts: the first, The End of the World as Seen on Earth, was a critique of the Western worldview; the second, The End of the World as Seen from Earth, was a commentary on the destruction of the earth by humanity. Both the drawings and the photographs had been printed in black and white and reproduced in colored pen on white paper, and they were framed in black-and-white. The photographs were taken from the windows of a television set. The drawings were taken from the streets of the city of Chicago. The images show a man and a bear, but their heads are covered with what appears to be blood, a sign that is an ominous signifier.The drawings are composed of text and images that evoke the discourse of political and social change. The text is a diary, a statement of intent, and the images are set in a manner that makes it difficult to read. In one, a woman walks in the distance, wearing a black dress.

Result #5

the work reflects on Hungary's neoliberal turn and the . ethno-nationalism and autocracy undermining the lack of environmental and social policy veloping during the post-dictatorship period, and in the context of the now-infamous privatization of the countrys water supply. The show was organized by the Hungarian Helsinki Group, which is now the most prominent and prominent voice of opposition to the current government. In a gesture of solidarity with the opposition, the gallery showed two works by the artists of the Helsinki Group. The first, a video by Péter Szarka (an opposition politician who has been a member of the government since 1997), was shown alongside a selection of other works by the group. The video shows a young woman from the Helsinki Group performing a series of simple actions. The actions are neither violent nor dramatic, but they are an expression of ordinary life under a totalitarian regime. The video is also a political statement, as Szarka has used it in previous shows. The installation of this work, which includes a message board, a map, and a map of the country, was also a political statement. In fact, it was a political statement about the government's statements, which are political statements in the first place.The second work by the Helsinki Group, which was also a political statement, was shown on a monitor: an image of a solar eclipse. The image depicts the sun as a living organism, in a state of perpetual creation. The image was taken from a scientific illustration of the solar eclipse, but the message is that the image is a hoax. The work is a response to the idea of the eclipse as a hoax. The image consists of a video showing a group of people from the Helsinki Group, in which they are shown holding signs that say that the eclipse is a hoax. The message is that the eclipse is a hoax, and the idea of the eclipse as a hoax is itself a hoax. The work is a response to the idea of the government's suppression of the image of the eclipse.

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