Conceptual piece of radioactive waste buried in museum garden of 0.5 microcuries.

Result #1

Conceptual piece of radioactive waste buried in museum garden of 0.5 microcuries. (The same kind of garbage, the artists say, that was used to make the film The Last Picture Show, in which the voices of the dead are played over the sound of a gas explosion.) The notion of the dead, of the dead as a subject of art, is one that the artist has taken up in a number of works over the past decade, including his solo show at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, in 2011, and the series of paintings that he showed in the gallery courtyard at the same time. The works are not, however, like the film, in which the dead are depicted with a great deal of solemnity. In fact, they are the kind of works that are not just pictures of the dead—not films, not photographs, not even sculpture—but images that suggest that they are subjects of art. The works are more than the sum of their parts: They are not simply the residue of a process of creation, but are a kind of work in progress. The artist does not simply take a discarded object and make a sculpture of it, as in a film. He takes an object that is already a sculpture and transforms it into a work of art. The artist does not make a discarded object art and then combine it with a work of art. He does not turn a work of art into a sculpture; rather, he takes it apart and reassembles it in order to make something new out of it. He does not just take a trash can, a trash can, a sculpture, and a corpse, and make a sculpture out of it. He does not simply throw away a trash can, a trash can, a sculpture, and a corpse in order to make something new out of it. In fact, the artist does not throw away a trash can, a trash can, a sculpture, and a corpse in order to make something new out of it.

Result #2

Conceptual piece of radioactive waste buried in museum garden of 0.5 microcuries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Result #3

Conceptual piece of radioactive waste buried in museum garden of 0.5 microcuries. The artists in the show were Pauline Flora, Donald Fish, and Paul Toscano. The artist in the group is a musician who makes art by playing the flute and the recorder. His piece was titled Synthrome, and it consisted of two pairs of musical instruments: one a single instrument made of various musical instruments of the past—the flute, the recorder, and the flute, and the other a pair of instruments made of strings. The flute, which was played on a small flat-screen monitor, was a musical instrument, and it was played with a recorded voice that was then amplified and repeated. The recorder, which was also played on a small flat-screen monitor, was a record player. On the flat-screen monitor, the voice was the voice of a child who was also the child of a musician, and who spoke into the recorder.The two pairs of instruments were paired on the floor, and the child played the flute while the flute was played. The childs voice was amplified on the recorder and, while the recorder was played, the child's voice was distorted on the recorder and the flute was turned up loud. The child then turned to the camera and said, I play the recorder. I want you to hear it. You know, its an old instrument, and it sounds like you're getting old.

Result #4

Conceptual piece of radioactive waste buried in museum garden of 0.5 microcuries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Result #5

Conceptual piece of radioactive waste buried in museum garden of 0.5 microcuries.  This is the first of a series of installations and performances that will be presented in the two-part, three-month cycle of the artist-in-residence program at the San Francisco Museum of Art. The point of departure is to investigate the relationship between artist and museum, and the relationship of the work of art to its institutional context. The show will be divided into two parts. One of the first two sections is devoted to the artists personal history. The artists will be asked to describe their own life as a member of the Bay Area art community, and to provide information about their relationships with the gallery, the history of their art, and their artistic activities in general. This section will be followed by a reading of the artists writings on the history of art, which will include an essay by the artist. The second section, the other part of the show, will include a retrospective of the artists work in the Bay Area over the past several years, including a group of sculpture, drawings, and photographs.The idea of the artist-in-residence program is to provide a forum for the exchange of artists, whose work is often viewed as having a foreign cultural origin. This notion is reinforced by the fact that the program is open to artists of all nationalities. The artists will be asked to provide documentation of their work in a different context, and the project will be judged on the basis of the documents alone. The work of art will not be judged in a vacuum, but will be judged by its relation to the context in which it is exhibited, and the context in which it is seen. The artist will be asked to consider the implications of his work in relation to the cultural context in which it is presented, and will be asked to consider his relationship to the institution as a whole.The exhibition will be organized into three phases. The first phase, which will be presented in the fall, will consist of the work of art.

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