Although within his written statements Haegele places emphasis on queerness, his actual symbols are too abstracted to speak to

Result #1

Although within his written statements Haegele places emphasis on queerness, his actual symbols are too abstracted to speak to <|startoftext|>In the past, Laura Owens has explored the implications of the body as a site of power and agency. In her most recent project, titled Stag-Bag, 1989, Owens discovered an abandoned building that had been transformed into a large, narrow, concrete-block sculpture that she used as a sculptural base for her own handiwork. The work consists of two sections. The first consists of a small, somewhat crude wooden box on the floor. On the floor, Owens has placed a single, black, crude-edged piece of wood. This piece is about five feet in height, and is three feet long and one foot wide. The wooden piece is stuck to the wall, and its edges are painted a dirty brown. At the same time, it stands on a small platform, so that it appears to be a pedestal. The platform is covered in sand, and the sand is strewn about the floor. The sand is turned into a sort of material support for the sculpture. The sand is broken, but not entirely, and one can see the traces of the wood still embedded in the sand. This work is a more intimate, less physical work.The second section of the work consists of a large, painted, wood-and-sand sculpture. This piece, which also stands on the floor, is about ten feet long and about three feet wide. The sculpture is covered with sand. The sand is broken and covered with a large, smooth, white, yellow, and black stencil. The stencil is cut into a shape, and the broken sand is partially covered by a small, rough, black, and white stencil. The sand is strewn about the floor. The stencils cut into the sand and the stencils are covered in sand. The sand is broken and covered with a small, rough, black, and white stencil, which stands on the floor.

Result #2

Although within his written statements Haegele places emphasis on queerness, his actual symbols are too abstracted to speak to <|startoftext|>In the early 90s, Yael Bartana began to exhibit photographs that he had taken with a small camera. Each one was a single-frame shot that was then printed, in color, on aluminum. As the cameras shutter was close to the glass, the photograph became a mosaic of the surrounding space. The resulting works, which were shown here together, are almost abstract: The compositions are defined by the shadows cast by the camera lens, which is also a background, but one that is made up of geometric forms that are represented by lines. In the last few years, Bartana has also turned to the photographic process in a series of works that he has made using his own body as a subject. The photographic process is the same as that of painting, and the only difference is that the work is made with an eye, a hand, a hand tool, and a camera.The work on view in this exhibition was made between 1999 and 2002, and was made by means of a small camera and a hand tool: a razor blade, a knife, and a razor. The blades are made of aluminum, and the razor blade is mounted on an aluminum plate, which is cut into the blades and then engraved with a pattern of lines. The blades are made of light-colored aluminum, and are covered with an adhesive that covers the blades, which are then exposed. The razor blades are then removed, and the work is divided into four parts: a white, thin, rectangular metal plate; a piece of paper that is folded, folded, folded, and folded; and a photograph. The photograph shows the white, thin, rectangular metal, and a hand tool, which has been folded and has been cut, folded, folded, and cut. The image is then placed on the paper, and the photograph is repeated over and over again, cutting the paper, and then removed.

Result #3

Although within his written statements Haegele places emphasis on queerness, his actual symbols are too abstracted to speak to <|startoftext|>The museum installation The Art of the New Jerusalem, the Artists Book Project, and the Global Village, curated by Angela de la Rosa and Matthias Schütte, made a case for an alternative to the art-historical linearity that has dominated so much post-Modernism. In this installation, the works were grouped according to the subjects they express, and the subject was the New Jerusalem. A small text explaining the project appeared at the entrance to the gallery, and there were posters showing the artists books in the library, each labeled with the title of one of the works. The posters were also accompanied by a sound track of various ethnic music, and the installation was punctuated by sounds of dancing and singing. The installation was thus a kind of micro-monumental monument, with an imaginary or unrealized New Jerusalem as the center of its reality.The exhibition itself was set up in a simple, open-plan gallery. The installation began with the works. The installation included a set of small wooden panels covered with a white cloth, with a couple of plastic bottles placed on top of the cloth. On the cloth were a few pieces of paper, and on the bottles, a blue plastic bag with a small red plastic bag. This was a kind of experimental sculpture: an act of creation. The other works on display were made from similar materials, and all were covered with a similar cloth. The exhibition was also divided into two groups, one of which was devoted to works in the form of sculptures, the other to installations. The sculptures were made of wood, or of a kind of wood, like a wooden box. They were placed on the floor in a narrow space, and the audience was invited to sit on them, which was then illuminated by a light box. The works were arranged on the floor, and the viewer was invited to move about them.

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Although within his written statements Haegele places emphasis on queerness, his actual symbols are too abstracted to speak to <|startoftext|>The first thing one notices about Jen Grooms photographs is that they are of the most basic sort: of a single figure, usually the artist himself, seated alone in a dark room. In the two recent series in which Grooms has been working, the figures are usually at the end of the room, either dead or in the process of being beaten up. The Beat is the usual, ungraspable, and often hilarious, or else they are, in the most literal sense, a sign of a bad situation. The Beat is a kind of generalization that can be applied to the whole of human existence, and is certainly not a condemnation of it. The Beat is the way that an individual becomes a generic, meaningless, and dislocating generic. He becomes an anonymous signifier, which can be interpreted by others as meaning anything. The Beat is a sign of the triumph of impersonality over difference, of the alienation of the individual from social reality. Grooms photographs of these beatings are of the Beat, the person who became a generic signifier.Grooms images are of two kinds: photographs that were taken with a camera and a blank sheet of paper; and photographs that were taken without a camera, but with a blank sheet of paper. The photographs that were taken with a camera are generally of a figure in a dark room, a blank sheet of paper, or a group of them. The Beat is the only figure in the group. The Beat is the only figure in the room that is not alone in it. The Beat is the only one who is alone. The Beat is the only person who is not a stereotype. The Beat is the only one who is not a symbol of a bad situation.The photographs that were taken without a camera are all of a similar type. The Beat is the only one who is not a stereotype. The Beat is the only one who is not a symbol of a bad situation.

Result #5

Although within his written statements Haegele places emphasis on queerness, his actual symbols are too abstracted to speak to <|startoftext|>The London-born, Glasgow-based artist Derek Jarmans recent exhibition is a survey of his work from the past decade, which has included paintings, collages, and drawings. The majority of the pieces on view date from the mid-90s, and represent his first solo show in New York. The majority are paintings on canvas, which are hung on the wall in a way that suggests a vast, empty gallery. The works on view are all untitled, and they are all located in the same room, one on top of the other, so that they are arranged in a grid. The grid is the basis of the works; it is a system of organization in which each work is assigned a number, so that each number corresponds to a particular piece of work. The works are also placed in a succession of small enclosures. In the middle of the room, a series of white canvases hangs from the ceiling. These canvases are made from canvas stretched over metal studs, so that the canvas is stretched, and then the studs are bent in such a way that they are partially hidden from view. In the same room, a series of white canvases is placed over a series of black ones. The black paintings are blacker than the white ones, and they are arranged in a similar way so that they are partially hidden from view. In the end, the black paintings are the only ones with any substance. The white ones, on the other hand, have no substance, and they are placed in the same way as the white ones. Their color contrasts are simply too thick and too much for the white ones to make any sense. The white paintings are thus the only ones with any substance, and they are not painted on the canvas, which is what they are.The paintings are usually hung on the wall in rows, and they are generally divided into groups of three.

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