further ash is a found poem, an assemblage, which uses, as a source text, the Merriam Webster's Tenth Edition Collegiate dictionary. Moving

Result #1

beyond the present, then, the airy, formal, and masculinely seductive qualities of this work make us wonder about the fact that the artists, in their yearning for an early-1960s, 1960s, and 70s style, were simply translating the vocabulary of Pop into a stylistic context which, in the end, may have been a major influence on such artists as Kelly, in part, through the influence of James Rosenquist. Perhaps it was only a matter of time, then, before the artists were seen as one-dimensional. In fact, one might even say that their sensibility had entered a stylistic phase, but, in any case, the effect of these images was to turn what might have been seen as a self-consciously boy-oriented aesthetic (the glorification of male-authored dictionaries) into a rather hard-core and male-coded concern. It seems that the past is also a sign of the future, and, in the end, a sign that the present is only a measure of the future.

Result #2

further ash is a found poem, an assemblage, which uses, as a source text, the Merriam Webster's Tenth Edition Collegiate dictionary. Moving through these images is like walking through a number of work in progress, each picture a turning point of a series that has yet to be completed. The phrase IMMA JESSE SHERMANS THERE, on a male body, is the title of a work made for a show by the artist. Sheridan has also painted an image of a womans torso with the words EXPLICIT BITCH, in the shape of a squiggly R. The two sides of the image are painted in an abstract style, but the three-part image is cropped out of the lower half of the canvas. This section of the work is surrounded by a field of mostly black spray paint, as if Sheridan were trying to erase the racist undercurrents of the show. The text itself is a number of expressions, including I LOVE YOU, I LOVE YOU AHEAD, I LOVE YOU, I LOVE YOU. Sheridan has also painted a big O on the wall, so that it seems like the O is being tossed into a pile of shit. In the last two paintings, Sheridan has painted a silhouetted figure of herself and her lover, the artist, in a tuxedo and tie. The title of the work, I LOVE YOU, I LOVE YOU, I LOVE YOU, I LOVE YOU is painted above the painting Sheridan has used to replace the words.The work has a similar feel to an aria by the cellist Sonja Stich. In fact, the piece is based on the singers song The Song of Love, a love song, in which Sheridan sings her love songs to the heavens. This work has a kind of romantic quality, although it is not romantic in the sense that Sheridan is suggesting that the artist is a romantic. Her lover, the artist, is the artist and the work is abstract. Her work suggests that, in all of Sheridan's work, there is always a conversation going on between the object of desire and the work of art.

Result #3

further ash is a found poem, an assemblage, which uses, as a source text, the Merriam Webster's Tenth Edition Collegiate dictionary. Moving beyond the subject matter, the poems, along with the paintings, were based on photographs, which were then removed and rearranged to convey their new meaning. In the series titled An Inconvenient Truth, 1979–88, the photographs are supplemented with other objects, and they are juxtaposed with collages and sculpture. The use of collage is in itself a subversive method, a way of transforming the quotidian into a postverbal, super-art form. Here, collage is used to evoke a life of alienated labor, a way of revealing the places of control and alienation from which we all have to grow.The collages that form the basis of the work are actually drawings that have been made by drawing and printing and have been pasted onto paper. The images have been superimposed over the collage-images, in which collage-images are superimposed over the collaged images. The collages in turn replace the collages that have been pasted over the collage-images, as if to say that the collage-images have been used, like the collage-images, to reveal the differences between collage and collage. The collage-images are signs of the divisions that exist between and between collage and collage—between collage and collage, collage and collage. For this reason, the collage-images, like the collage-images, have been used to serve as the means by which we collectively and individually disclose the gap between collage and collage. The collage-images, like the collage-images, reveal the ways in which the dualism that exists between collage and collage has been used to represent, in a social and political context, a nonhuman subjectivity.The collage-images, like the collage-images, are conceived as documents of the separation of subjects and objects.

Result #4

further ash is a found poem, an assemblage, which uses, as a source text, the Merriam Webster's Tenth Edition Collegiate dictionary. Moving along a leafy branch, the poem is interrupted by a leafy bough, which turns into a human body, a branch, then a human head, and finally a human face. The poem ends with the artist as a skull, but it never really gives up.

Result #5

further ash is a found poem, an assemblage, which uses, as a source text, the Merriam Webster's Tenth Edition Collegiate dictionary. Moving through the exhibition, one had the sensation of going from one familiar gallery to another, from one work to another, without being able to fully grasp each individual images (one might have been tempted to walk around and around, but the exhibition was otherwise inaccessible) and without the artist having a clue as to what was going on. It is as if the work was a collection of sounds and noises that the artist could not fully understand, and which he wished to completely assimilate. There was no one there to explain.All of the images were taken from private collections. They included an old-master painting of the Louvre, a group of drawings from her studio, a group of photos, and a single-channel video installation, all of which were combined into a work called Bump (all works, 2017), which was installed in a small, windowless room at the center of the gallery. This was the first work in the installation to be located directly in front of the window, as if one were viewing a video from a distance. It was also the first work that had a window in it. The gallery was therefore flooded with sounds. The gallery was filled with sound. While it is still possible to walk through the work, it is no longer possible to avoid it. The work becomes a banged-up, fluctuating world. The works were then moved to another room, which was next to a video installation that was part of the show. That work, Unheimlich, was created specifically for this exhibition, which was to have been titled Schütze, an abbreviation of the German word for sadism. Unheimlich is a title that means, in German, mad. The artist's first attempt at a total cultural project.But Schütze became a problem in the gallery: It was not enough just to have a small, windowless space; it had to be a space that was accessible and could be navigated.

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