truth materials television fairies culture bird poo laughter music pink Cindy Lou pineapples tangerines wood paint film video moving image

Result #1

truth materials television fairies culture bird poo laughter music pink Cindy Lou pineapples tangerines wood paint film video moving image vernacular (commercial) photos of the world from a computer-generated digital camera. The images include examples of the hyperbolic world of television, and, in one case, of a newspaper image of a woman, covered in plaster, in a bathtub. The idea is that the work is about the degradation of the media, and the need for alternative media to fix its broken systems of transmission. The first work on display, a video, shows an angel, floating above a pool of water, with a gold-framed camera and a camera that looks like a giant, live-tape-delivered Fax machine. The angel, the title of the piece, is a reference to a scene in a Hitchcock film in which the character is trapped in a dungeon and is continually freed by the use of a phone, which also appears in the video. The video shows the artist walking along a beach, having fun and drinking beer with a group of boaters. The footage shows the artist, dressed in a bathing suit, laughing, singing, and carrying a phone to his ear. The camera pans around the group to a group of water sportsmen. The scene is interrupted by a voice-over that says, Do you guys see the angel? The group turns around and sees the angel, and the video cuts to a shot of the pool. The scene is interrupted by a break of silence that announces that the pool is full, and the camera cuts to a shot of the artist standing in the same position as the pool, his phone in his hand. The scene is interrupted by a voice-over that says, The angel is coming in. The angel comes in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in. The angel is coming in.

Result #2

truth materials television fairies culture bird poo laughter music pink Cindy Lou pineapples tangerines wood paint film video moving image vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vernacular vern

Result #3

truth materials television fairies culture bird poo laughter music pink Cindy Lou pineapples tangerines wood paint film video moving image vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars vernaculars

Result #4

truth materials television fairies culture bird poo laughter music pink Cindy Lou pineapples tangerines wood paint film video moving image vernacular theater typeface dollhouse amorphous, long-haired people dancing in the rainy night of a Dumpster, and a blaring, almost maniacal, disco disco soundtrack. These were the artists first solo show in New York. She is known for her performances of the 1970s as a drag queen and a drag queen, and for her own performance as a high-energy female alter ego. She was the only artist in the show to use a gender-specific identity as a means of dramatizing her own work. This was a subtle but significant shift in the artists perspective, since her previous works—the only ones included—have been concerned with the construction of her own identity and self-image.As the artist herself has said, I feel that my art is about the construction of myself. I have always been aware of the transience of the work, the possibility of it becoming an object of desire, of a devolution of desire into a commodity. And so the idea of my work as a commodity was a constant in my thinking. But I also recognize that the work has a certain self-consciousness, a certain sense of humor, and I also have a certain admiration for the art of the commodified self, and the selfs tendency to assimilate its own commodity qualities. This is the work of a woman, and it is also a work of art, but it is also a commodity, and a commodity is also a woman. The work is, of course, a play on the conventions of the art world, but the work is also an artifice, a trick.It is telling that while the work was produced by the artist as a woman, it was made by men. This was not necessarily a defect. The shows most successful moments were those in which the work, with the exception of a few works, was found to be masculine.

Result #5

vernacular. In the end, though, the other pieces in the exhibition were too derivative to be taken as cultural references. Even the most exuberant cultural art can become a gimmick, as demonstrated by the attempts to bring art into the home, which were clearly not the artists intention. The style of the video installation, for example, was that of the black-and-white television screen in which the objects depicted were constantly changing, giving the work a sense of surreal comedy. The same could be said for the tableaux of the wood-and-metal sculpture that sat on the floor in the middle of the gallery. This work was an homage to the idea of the artist as maker, but with a different message. The sculpture, which looked like a small painting, was made of wood and metal. The white porcelain surface was covered with a sheet of plywood and was decorated with plastic cutouts. The cutout of the wooden sculpture, like the cutout of the painting, gave the sculpture a sense of being a part of the gallery, and as such an artistic presence. But the sculpture was also a cheap, easy material, and its construction seemed to depend on the artist to complete the job.The contrast between the work of an artist and that of a commercial product is always a subject of debate. The most influential artists are those who always find a way to confront the contradiction between the arts and commerce. The work of the avant-garde is often characterized by an attempt to reach an artistic middle ground between the two. But it is in the end the latter that wins out. The avant-garde is always concerned with the question of artistic production, but this does not necessarily mean that it seeks a middle point between the two. Rather, as noted above, the question is one of the questions of production itself, not of art.

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