Monika Vardis guardian of harmony suggests a balance of life and death. Her inspiration ancient Egypt, goddess Hathor, results in sacred pillars made of bones. Femininity

Result #1

Monika Vardis guardian of harmony suggests a balance of life and death. Her inspiration ancient Egypt, goddess Hathor, results in sacred pillars made of bones. Femininity ̈s dejection, she suggests, is not the only way to embrace mortality.The exhibition The Other One is about the Other One, and it is in this sense that the work of Marta del Pozo is relevant: it reminds us of the distinction between our desire to understand and our desire to be understood. And this is what is revealed in the shows title, the words of which are taken from the poets own words: a mother with a son, who has fallen from the heights, who is pregnant with a daughter, who, in the name of all, has delivered the child to the other, to the Other. Marta del Pozo is a mother, but she does not want to give birth to a son; she wants to make a new beginning for herself, and to bring about a new relationship with the Other. The exhibition is a journey of discovery, and the journey is marked by an awareness of the other. It is as if the Other is a child who is looking at the mothers face; she is in fact the Other. This is the Other who is the mother of the son, and who is the mother of the son, the Other. The mother who has delivered the child to the other is the Other. The Other is the one who has given birth to the child, but the child is the one who is the mother of the Other. Marta del Pozo wants to go beyond giving birth to a son, and to do so, she wants to become a mother. And so she sets aside her search for a son, in order to conceive of a relationship with the Other. This is a relationship that is spiritual, not merely physical. In this exhibition, we see how Marta del Pozo goes beyond giving birth to a son in order to conceive of a relationship with the Other. The Other One is conceived in this way: she seeks to reach the point of understanding, but she cannot.

Result #2

Monika Vardis guardian of harmony suggests a balance of life and death. Her inspiration ancient Egypt, goddess Hathor, results in sacred pillars made of bones. Femininity . . . but also death, her secret lies in the same symbolic vein as the labyrinth.The artists work is both funny and dark. Some of it is very light, like a lot of drawings, and some is very dark, like a lot of art. The humor is almost always light, as in the drawings. But there are also some dark pieces, like the black, black, and white wall, which is really a dark mirror of the world itself. The black wall, with its eyes, is an image of the world. It is the only black wall in the gallery, and it is the symbol of death and loneliness. The black wall is the symbol of death and loneliness. The black wall is also the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of death and loneliness. The black wall is the symbol of death and loneliness. The black wall is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of death and loneliness. The black wall is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying. It is the symbol of a person who has lost the strength to live and who is dying.

Result #3

Monika Vardis guardian of harmony suggests a balance of life and death. Her inspiration ancient Egypt, goddess Hathor, results in sacred pillars made of bones. Femininity ̈s a female identity, and as such, the feminine is a symbol of peace and harmony. In her installation, Vardi assumed the role of a woman who, in a dream, in the nude, at the age of thirty-one, was transformed into a statue, a goddess. The archetypal figure of the woman of the desert, in the form of the goddess, was seen as a female figure, but with a great quantity of hair growing out of her head. This hair was a sign of the power of the goddess, which she possessed, and of her feminine strength. The goddess was not only a woman of peace and harmony, but also a woman of war and destruction.The title of this piece is a quote from the poet Michael C. Fletcher. It is a reference to the myth of the goddess, who was the source of the battle between good and evil. The clash between these two forces was symbolized by the figure of Hathor, the goddess of light, who gave birth to the evil one, who was the source of the battle between good and evil. Vardi implies that we can see ourselves as the two opposing forces of creation, the female and the male. For Vardi, the female is the manifestation of power, and it is the power of the goddess, the goddess of life and death. It is the power of the goddess who gives birth to the evil one, who is the source of the battle between good and evil. The goddess Hathor is the symbol of death, and it is death that produces the female. This is the theme of the exhibition. The female body, in its most fundamental and most mysterious form, is the temple of the goddess, the tomb of the goddess. It is the tomb of the goddess, the place where the gods are buried. The female body, with all its sins, is the place where the transgressions of the gods are forgiven.

Result #4

Monika Vardis guardian of harmony suggests a balance of life and death. Her inspiration ancient Egypt, goddess Hathor, results in sacred pillars made of bones. Femininity  is a force of forces, a connection of opposites, a state of being. The strength of her work lies in her ability to depict the presence of opposites as both a source of strength and a source of danger. It is this strength that is revealed in the work of both the Egyptian and the contemporary female sculptor. Vardis has always been fascinated by the female body, and the juxtaposition of the two, the balance between the sacred and the secular, the fertility of the earth with the destruction of the human body. In this sense, her sculptures are about the sacred and the profane. Her sculpture is a celebration of the body, and it is also a celebration of the sacred feminine body, which, as a goddess, has been the source of strength and power for many women. Vardis has created a body of bronze figures of a mother and child, a mourner, and it is through the maternal body that the sculptural body is made visible.In the new work, however, Vardis has made the female body seem like a symbol of purity. The sculptural body is combined with a bronze one, which symbolizes the female body, and it is reflected in the bronze. The bronze body, in turn, is combined with the bronze, and the female body is reflected in the bronze. The connection of the two figures becomes an emotional one. In this work, the female body is revealed as the symbol of the female, and it is a sacred female body, and the bronze female body is a profane female body. The bronze female body is an oblation of the female body, and the bronze female body is the oblation of the female body. The oblation is symbolic of the feminine body; it is also a fertility symbol. Vardis has taken the body of the woman as a sacrifice to the male world and has broken it.

Result #5

is a central motif, too: in the monumental sculptures she made in collaboration with painter Marina Valerio, the figures are set on pedestals of their own making, while in the paintings they are immersed in a more domestic landscape. It is as if the artist were asking: How does one be an artist and a mother? In the end, all of this was a form of meditation.

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