Ashley L. Schick works in printmaking and paper arts, inspired by the flora and fauna of her neighborhood walks. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, has been installed in film sets, and is held in multiple private and university collections. She earned an MFA in Printmaking, where she also worked as the lead printer and constructor for Kiki Smith’s artist book Color Noise. She has completed studio work at Ballinglen Art Foundation in Ireland, the UF Paris Research Center in France, and at the Skopelos Foundation in Greece.

Result #1

Ashley L. Schick works in printmaking and paper arts, inspired by the flora and fauna of her neighborhood walks. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, has been installed in film sets, and is held in multiple private and university collections. She earned an MFA in Printmaking, where she also worked as the lead printer and constructor for Kiki Smith’s artist book Color Noise. She has completed studio work at Ballinglen Art Foundation in Ireland, the UF Paris Research Center in France, and at the Skopelos Foundation in Greece. At the time of her first New York solo exhibition, she was one of the few artists included in the seminal Eighties show The New Image, which brought together the work of artists like Andy Warhol, Haim Steinbach, and Richard Prince. Schicks new show included fifteen pieces, all from her past three years, along with photographs and text from her previous exhibitions. The show was a collection of odd and familiar items, all reflecting her ongoing fascination with the symbolic power of objects.The exhibition started with a large, freestanding wall-size work, a collage of several tiny, intricately woven, multi-layered, painted metal bars. These are not merely barbells or barbells, though. They are emblems of a kind of material presence—a kind of representation—which Schick has used in her work before. In her 1999 show at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, for example, she was represented by a series of barbells and barbells, and a suite of photographs of barbells on display in a jewelry shop. In this show, Schicks objects were used as tiny, jumbled, colorful, and translucent images.In the exhibition, Schicks subjects are not the barbells but rather the woman as object. In the center of the room was a small, freestanding table. A pair of blue sneakers rested on it, a pair of blue jeans and a pair of blue jeans. The shoe soles of one were left open, so that the other pair, blue and white, rested on the table. On the floor lay a pair of blue sneakers. A small red workboy jacket was wrapped around the table, with a tattered hood pulled over it. On top of the table were several pairs of sneakers, the ones on the table being tied to the table, and the sneakers worn. Schicks own sneakers, which had been left out of the collage, lay on the floor.

Result #2

Ashley L. Schick works in printmaking and paper arts, inspired by the flora and fauna of her neighborhood walks. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, has been installed in film sets, and is held in multiple private and university collections. She earned an MFA in Printmaking, where she also worked as the lead printer and constructor for Kiki Smith’s artist book Color Noise. She has completed studio work at Ballinglen Art Foundation in Ireland, the UF Paris Research Center in France, and at the Skopelos Foundation in Greece. The New York Times has named her a contemporary artist of the year, and her work has been covered extensively in the pages of the New York Times, The New Yorker, and the New York Times Magazine. This, she has written, is not a typical yearbook, but it does provide an important clue to her work. Her prints are not only records of her daily travels but also of her relationships with other artists, and of her participation in group shows and photojournalistic events.Schick has been widely seen in New York since the late 1980s, when she was included in the Whitney Biennial, and she has received numerous solo museum shows, including a solo show at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. She has been included in numerous exhibitions of this nature in Europe, and she has had an exhibition in Brussels at the Centre dArt Contemporain. In addition to her large-scale prints, she has also been making drawings, paintings, and photographs. She has been included in a number of international exhibitions.Schicks work, though often small and intimate, is not only intimate but also physical. She is concerned with what might be termed the mark as a material presence. She uses the medium of photography to document her daily activities. She takes photographs of places that are familiar to her, such as a park bench or a bench in the park. These are also photographs of her studio. She takes photographs of objects she is using in her studio, such as a paintbrush, a screwdriver, and a hammer. She makes these objects public by showing them in her studio, where they become a part of her work. She also takes photographs of her own studio, as if they were the things she kept in her studio, and she made them public to the public. She uses the objects in her studio as a kind of public artwork, so that they become part of her work.Schicks most recent prints are made in collaboration with the artist Barbara Bloom.

Result #3

Ashley L. Schick works in printmaking and paper arts, inspired by the flora and fauna of her neighborhood walks. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, has been installed in film sets, and is held in multiple private and university collections. She earned an MFA in Printmaking, where she also worked as the lead printer and constructor for Kiki Smith’s artist book Color Noise. She has completed studio work at Ballinglen Art Foundation in Ireland, the UF Paris Research Center in France, and at the Skopelos Foundation in Greece. The exhibition, which opened at the Galerie Kiki Smith in London, was accompanied by her book, Color Noise: An Introduction to Contemporary Art from Ireland to Greece, and was organized by the artist. The show included two large-scale works, one a sort of self-portrait in color, the other a group of small drawings in which she appears nude, sometimes with the addition of a head. The drawing Self-Portrait in Color, 2001, was shown on a white-carpeted wooden box. The first work one encountered was Self-Portrait in Self-Portrait, 2001, a self-portrait in color. It is a photograph of the artist, who is standing with her back to the viewer, with a cigarette in her mouth and a cigarette in her hand. The picture, which is a self-portrait in color, is of her as a nude woman, her nude back to the viewer. She has been smoking and staring at her reflection in a mirror. The image is a self-portrait, and the picture is a self-portrait. This is the only work in the show that does not involve the artists body, but instead involves the things that surround her. These are the things that surround her, and the things that surround us. She is surrounded by objects that she is supposed to be surrounded by, objects that are supposed to be in contact with her. In a sense, we are in contact with her, and we are supposed to take it as a compliment. But this is not a compliment. This is a self-reflexivity, and Self-Portrait in Self-Portrait, 2001, is the most direct, most direct work in the show.The other large work, Self-Portrait in Color, 2001, was also self-portraits in color. It consists of a group of four white-carpeted wooden boxes.

Result #4

Ashley L. Schick works in printmaking and paper arts, inspired by the flora and fauna of her neighborhood walks. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, has been installed in film sets, and is held in multiple private and university collections. She earned an MFA in Printmaking, where she also worked as the lead printer and constructor for Kiki Smith’s artist book Color Noise. She has completed studio work at Ballinglen Art Foundation in Ireland, the UF Paris Research Center in France, and at the Skopelos Foundation in Greece. The exhibition was divided into three groups: The Sanctuary Series, 2006–2008; The Sanctuary Series, 2009–, a series of black-and-white prints, the first of which was shown at the 2010 Venice Biennale; and The Sanctuary Series, 2010–, a series of small prints, all of which were installed in the gallery. The Sanctuary Series consists of a large black-and-white print, framed on each side by a single word or phrase, such as the title of the piece, the artists last name, and the date of her death. The words are written in black ink on a white ground, and the prints are hung on the wall. The works are, as the title suggests, at once anonymous and anonymous: I was told that I would be anonymous and that I would be protected by my art, writes one. The works suggest the solitude of death, but the words are drawn with a smiley face, and the figure of the artist seems to be smiling. In the Sanctuary Series, the word DIALOGUE appears directly on the image, which shows a hand reaching out from the frame to touch the shoulder of a young girl. The hand is part of a hand-print that covers the whole of the frame, and the two sides of the frame are filled with letters, which are written in black ink. The words are not in English, but in Greek, the language of the Greek gods. The girl appears to be a woman in her late twenties, and the letters are in Greek script. The artist is holding a handprint of her own, which is carved in the shape of a Greek-style shield. The image of the handprint is a small one, but it is covered with a smiley face, and the message is in Greek. In the Sanctuary Series, the word PASSAGE appears directly on a photograph of a young girl, also in her late twenties, and she is also holding a handprint.

Result #5

Ashley L. Schick works in printmaking and paper arts, inspired by the flora and fauna of her neighborhood walks. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, has been installed in film sets, and is held in multiple private and university collections. She earned an MFA in Printmaking, where she also worked as the lead printer and constructor for Kiki Smith’s artist book Color Noise. She has completed studio work at Ballinglen Art Foundation in Ireland, the UF Paris Research Center in France, and at the Skopelos Foundation in Greece. This show featured photographs taken by her daughter. They are recreations of everyday objects that have been photographed and edited, and she has reconstructed them in her own image as well as her daughters. The work is a nostalgic self-portrait, but one that has a nostalgic quality as well. The sense of time in these photographs is of a personal, rather than an artistic, past.Schick has been making photographs of the world since the late 1970s, and the series of images included here reflects a gradual shift in her practice from a formalist to a more painterly approach. The photographs were taken with a large-format camera, and the resulting prints are often scaled to the size of the original prints, in which the artist has added details of her own signature. The prints, which have a photographic quality, are often also bound to the original photograph.Schicks photographs are often animated by her reflections on the world around her. The works that were shown here were made from photographs taken by her daughter, taken at the same places where Schicks work was taken. The photographs were accompanied by the artists own notes, which included observations about the pictures, and the texts that accompany them. In the photographs, Schicks own reflections seem to be more animated than the photographs.Schicks photographs are like memories, which are kept in a state of intimacy, in which the camera is a surrogate for the eye. The photographs, which are usually taken with the camera, are often accompanied by notes that accompany them, and the texts that accompany them. In one photograph, Schicks daughter appears to be gazing at a landscape view of the city, and she takes the image as an interpretation of the cityscape. In another, her daughter stands before a large waterfall. She seems to be looking at the water in a detached manner, as if she were observing it from a distance. The photographs also include notes about the location of the shots and the time of the shots taken.

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