seven large ceramic spheres, in an uneven row:

Result #1

seven large ceramic spheres, in an uneven row: one yellow, one orange, one green, and one white. The work is titled Blue and White, 2011, and the accompanying color scheme is composed of three bands of white, two black, and one white, along with an orange, a black, and a white. These colors are applied in layers, to create a material surface that is almost translucent, as if the process were not quite in line with the materials on which it was based. The result is a sort of white canvas on a black ground. The pieces are quite massive and suggest something between a tree trunk and a giant forest. The two-dimensional format recalls the surface of a painting and its relationship to the wall, as well as the materiality of clay, the texture of clay, and the way in which the clay forms a surface that seems to expand and contract with the viewers movements. They are painted, in fact, on the surface of the clay, which is then covered with a layer of paint, creating a surface that is both sculptural and painterly. In this case, the work is all about painting, and the fact that this is a solo show, with no gallery to speak of, and no press to speak of, is not a hindrance to it. Indeed, the shows title—and the fact that the work is made up of two large ceramic spheres—is a reference to painting. The spheres are painted with a palette knife that is used in painting; the paint is then rubbed onto the surface, creating a surface that is almost airy. And so, one might say, these paintings are about painting, but they are not about painting.The works in this show were made with the palette knife and on top of it, in a vitrine, are two large and very large spheres, painted white. They are placed on the ground in a way that recalls the position of the viewer, but one that is more naturalistic.

Result #2

one on top of the other, painted black, the other white. (The effect was of a non-symmetrical structure, but one that was not quite as geometric as the others.) The final piece is a pile of aluminum plates: a squat stack of four, piled one on top of the other, and painted black.The title of the show, The Dominance of Art, is a fitting one: the dominant and perhaps even historicizing force in art. The power of the art object, the power of the artist as master of his own creation, is thus felt in the realm of art and its absence; in this sense, the artist becomes an absent presence, one whose absence is inscribed in the absence of the other. This is what makes the work of Robert Ryman so attractive to many younger artists. Ryman has been around for a long time, and he has been around a long time. He has had to face the question of what to do with the work of art. The work of art is no longer the master. It is only a presence—a presence that is, in its absence, only a presence. Ryman has made the art object visible, not invisible.The presence of the work of art is a presence that is not only an absence; it is a presence that does not exist except in the absence of the work of art. Ryman has made the absence visible. He has made the absence visible; the absence is a presence. The absence of the work of art is an absence, which is why Ryman has made it visible.

Result #3

seven large ceramic spheres, in an uneven row: a few beads, a piece of string, and a small, dark, water-filled basin. The basin is filled with water, and is filled with water again. The string, a very small, dark string, is stuck to the bottom of the basin, and stands out from the surrounding ground. The string is the only object of contact between the ground and the string. The water in the basin is very cold, and is frozen in place. This small, dark, string is the one thing that can be seen from the outside. But it is only a fragment of a large, multicolored, black string, which is visible from the outside. This black string has been painted black, and is visible through the cracks of a small, dark, water-filled basin. The string is broken, and the blackness of the water causes the blackness of the string to be visible through the cracks. The water is frozen, and the blackness of the string, and the blackness of the water, is visible through the cracks of the basin. The blackness of the string is not visible from the outside, but only from the inside, where the blackness of the string is visible. The blackness of the string, and the blackness of the blackness of the water, are two sides of the same black-string that can be seen from the outside, and vice versa.The word here is simple, but it is not: it is a description. The word is not simply a description of a thing, but a description of the thing as such. The blackness of the string, and the blackness of the blackness of the water, and the string and the blackness of the water are two sides of the same black-string, and the blackness of the water and the string as such are two sides of the same black-string.

Result #4

seven large ceramic spheres, in an uneven row: a square of clay and a sphere of the same size. The objects are arranged in a way that suggests a series of scattered household objects, with the clay at the bottom of the row and the sphere in the top. The little spheres are arranged in a way that suggests an indefinite series of objects, and the arrangement is repeated across the rows and columns. The objects, however, are small and often marked with faint brushstrokes. The marks are not just random, but are determined by the placement of the ceramic blocks in relation to the other elements. The clay is the ground for a series of drawings, which are executed by hand. These drawings are not just documents; they are also representations of the objects. The drawings of the objects are almost abstract, as if the drawings were also drawings of the objects. The drawings of the objects are often sketched in a painterly manner, as if the objects were also painted. The drawings of the objects are also often divided into rows and columns, as in a drawing of an object.The object is the foundation of the drawings, and the drawings, too. The drawings, in turn, are marked with marks of a kind that resemble the marks of a brush. The drawings are also made by the hand, with a brush that is very short and heavy, and a palette knife that is sharp and light. The marks, too, are made by the brush. The drawings, in turn, are made with a palette knife, a tool that is used in the same way as the brush, and in a similar way to the brush. The palette knife, too, is a tool used for the same purposes as the brush. It is the tool that, in this case, has been used to make the drawings. The drawings are made with the palette knife, and they are divided into squares and rows. The whole series of drawings is shown as a series of squares, and the rows of the drawings are marked with a brush.

Result #5

seven large ceramic spheres, in an uneven row: A row of circles is placed over a row of circles, and a row of triangles is placed over a row of triangles. This constant grid makes the drawings look like a series of infinite spirals, while also giving the work a sense of momentum and order. In the past, Sottsass work has been compared to that of Michael Asher, and in fact, the similarities are more superficial. Ashers drawings are, in a sense, serial, with one work having come before and following another, and with no clear distinction between the two. In contrast, Sottsass work is intuitively intuitive, and in a sense also empirical, with the grid serving as a delimiting device. In this sense, the grid is also a scaffolding for the drawings, an organizing principle for the drawings, which are composed of multiple elements that are placed on top of, or in relation to, the grid.The works in this show were created using an electronic drawing machine, and Sottsass intentions are to use the machine as a tool, not as a substitute. Her drawings are based on the machines ability to create precisely drawn images, and in this respect, the drawings are more like computer-generated images than paper. The images are the result of the drawing process itself, and the drawings are based on the same procedure. But here, the image is not a part of the drawing process, and the grid is not a precondition for the image. The images, however, are of a different nature, and they are constructed from a series of transparencies, which are then transferred to paper. The drawings are composed of a wide range of formal elements, ranging from the geometric, to the organic, to the organic-geometric, to the geometric, to the abstract. In this respect, they are similar to the work of other artists, such as, for example, Daniel Buren.

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