Priya Pena's paintings confront you with private moments, infused with a mix of delight and horror to

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Priya Pena's paintings confront you with private moments, infused with a mix of delight and horror to vernacular. At the same time, they reveal the power of the human body to become a vessel for the expression of the deepest fears and desires. In one work, a body of the artist's body, her belly and breasts exposed, is covered with a layer of paint, while a number of hands hold a paintbrush in a gesture of worship. In another, a woman, her face hidden, holds a brush, which she uses to brush her hair. In a third, a womans body is seen from behind, her face covered with a sheet of paper, her hands covering her breasts. The canvas is covered with a layer of paper that is filled with a photograph of the artist's body, her body covered in a sheet of paper. This painting is titled The Body as a Body, 1993, and the image of the artist's body is juxtaposed with the photograph of the female body, which shows a woman, her head covered with a sheet of paper. The juxtaposition of the two images creates a sense of intimacy that is both erotic and mysterious. This is a painting that wants to be intimate, but it refuses to be intimate. This is the deepest painting Ive seen in a while.The exhibition also included a number of sculptures, including a black-and-white photograph of a hand holding a paintbrush and a headless torso with an upturned umbrella. The sculptures, in turn, were covered with a layer of paper that was covered with a photograph of a woman, her body covered with a sheet of paper. In the end, these paintings, with their stark contrast between the self-consciousness of the artist's body and the self-consciousness of the painted surface, bring to mind the paintings of the 70s by Louise Bourgeois and Richard Diebenkorn. In this show, Pena's work was marked by a sense of humor, but it was also marked by the artists desire to reveal the body's vulnerability.

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vernacular. The artists works—like the paintings themselves—are small, and the gallery space is not large enough to accommodate them. Yet the works are strikingly intimate, with a feeling of intimacy that is profound, even as they are large.Pena's paintings are mostly of faces, and the faces are often almost abstract, with a range of features and features that range from a visage to a body part to a building to a sun-drenched landscape. The faces in these paintings are often close-ups of mouths and eyes, and the eyes in one case are almost black, with a little red dot in the center. This painting is not about the artist, but about the way people look. The paintings are not about what we see, but about the way we think we see.Penas works on paper, which is why she is so good at it. She paints faces with the best of intentions, and she knows how to paint a face with a smile or a mask of a smile. But the paintings suffer from the same kind of visual confusion that the paintings of the studio do: The faces in these paintings are often blurred out by the brushstrokes, and the faces that emerge from the brush are often distorted. Penas work is about the way we look, and about how we think we look, but it is also about how we see. Penas paintings are not about the artist, but about how we see.

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Priya Pena's paintings confront you with private moments, infused with a mix of delight and horror to ike of what is happening in the world. The artist's paintings are about the experience of seeing and what it means to see. They are about the struggle of being seen, about the possibility of being seen, about what it means to see. The paintings' sensuality is aroused by the tension between the desire to see and the awareness of being seen, the tension between the desire for recognition and the awareness of being seen.In the paintings' title, a phrase that sounds like a sentence, Pena uses a classical Greek word that means to be seen. The Greek word is related to the Greek word for the idea of seeing, which is to see something and not see. Penas paintings are about seeing, but also about seeing in the wrong way. Penas paintings are about seeing, but also about seeing in the wrong way. In one painting, for example, a woman's face is seen from the back, her head and shoulders are turned away from the viewer, and her eyes are closed. The painting's title is a phrase that means not to see, and it seems to be a reference to the fact that the woman's head is bowed. In another painting, a man's face is seen from the front, and his arms are raised in a gesture of surrender. The painting's title is a phrase that means not to see, and it seems to be a reference to the fact that the man's arms are tied up behind him. Penas paintings are about seeing, but also about seeing in the wrong way.In another painting, a woman's face is seen from the back, and her hands are spread out. The canvas's title is a phrase that means not to see, and it seems to be a reference to the fact that the woman's hands are tied up behind her. In another painting, a man's head is seen from the front, and his arms are raised.

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Priya Pena's paintings confront you with private moments, infused with a mix of delight and horror to ike your own. In the first room, the artist presented a series of drawings and paintings, each of which depicts a single nude woman in a pose of a seductively languid and vulnerable position. The figures are often in the state of undress, and their heads are always turned toward the viewer, as if they were about to take a pose. These paintings are filled with traces of the artists hand, which is evident in the traces of the paint. The figures are never fully clothed; they remain as silhouettes, as if in a dream, and they are always in the midst of a dance. In the second room, the artist showed a group of paintings, in which the same nude figures reappear, but now in a completely different pose. This time, the figures are all in the same pose, and the poses are in the same position, and the figures are all in the same position. This painting is also a work of abstract painting, with the figures as abstract forms, and the pose as the painting itself. In the third room, Pena showed a group of drawings and paintings, in which the same nude figures reappear, but in a new pose. The figures are in the same position, and the poses are in the same position. This painting is also a work of abstract painting, with the figures as abstract forms, and the pose as the painting itself. The paintings are all abstract, but they are not all abstract. They are not all abstract. The painterly gesture is still present, and the figures are still in the position of seductiveness, but the painterly gesture is gone. The only abstract image is the nude woman, who is in a pose of a seductiveness.The paintings are still in the same pose, but they are not in the same pose. The figures are in a pose of a seductiveness, but the painterly gesture has been removed. The paintings are still abstract, but they are not abstract.

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Priya Pena's paintings confront you with private moments, infused with a mix of delight and horror to ike a little of the sacred in the mundane. The first room of the gallery contained a group of works on paper (all Untitled) that were hung on the walls in a way that made them seem like the fruits of Pena's hands. The works were small, mostly made up of pencil lines and circles, and painted with a dry, waxy, almost dry brush. The lines, which were often faint, seemed to be a reflection of the artists own hands, and the circles seemed to be traces of the artists fingers touching the paper. Pena's works are not so much self-portraits as self-portraits of the artists own hands, and they are also not so much self-portraits as self-portraits of the artist's hands. The circles of Pena's drawings are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of Pena herself, and they are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of the artist's hands. Penas drawings are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of Pena herself. The circles of Penas drawings are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of Penas herself, and they are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of the artist's hands. The circles of Penas drawings are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of Penas herself, and they are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of the artist's hands. The circles of Penas drawings are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of Penas herself. The circles of Penas drawings are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of Penas herself. The circles of Penas drawings are not self-portraits as much as self-portraits of Penas herself.

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