arebyte Gallery presents a new commission by UK based artist Alan Warburton. RGBFAQ comprises a research-led experiential exhibition in which the audience navigates a "black-box" set populated by gigantic geometric sculptures. Warburton’s ambitious new video essay will be projection mapped onto this sculptural background, expanding the form of his popular video essays (Goodbye Uncanny Valley, Fairytales of Motion) into an immersive 3D space, with a soundtrack by David Kamp.

Result #1

arebyte Gallery presents a new commission by UK based artist Alan Warburton. RGBFAQ comprises a research-led experiential exhibition in which the audience navigates a "black-box" set populated by gigantic geometric sculptures. Warburton’s ambitious new video essay will be projection mapped onto this sculptural background, expanding the form of his popular video essays (Goodbye Uncanny Valley, Fairytales of Motion) into an immersive 3D space, with a soundtrack by David Kamp.In the video, the artist follows a group of college students as they drive around a rural highway. They pass a stop sign. The young men look at each other as if they were strangers on a street. A woman behind the wheel of a pickup asks the young men where they are headed. They turn and walk on, only to be stopped at a stop sign and asked where they are going. They tell her they are going to a gas station. The woman gives the driver a card, and they head for the nearest gas station. The artist stops to talk with the drivers, who tell him that the sign is a sign for a gas station. They all look around and see that the sign is a sign for a gas station. The artist asks the driver what the sign means. He tells him that it means that the gas station is a gas station. The woman explains that it means that the gas station is a gas station. The young men look at each other, confused, and say, Oh, thats right. They say, Oh, thats not quite right, either. The woman explains that the sign is a sign for a gas station, but a gas station is a sign for a gas station. The artist tells them that a sign for a gas station is a sign for a gas station. The young men say, Well, thats not quite right. The woman explains that a gas station is a sign for a gas station. The artist tells them that a gas station is a sign for a gas station. The young men say, Well, thats not quite right. The woman explains that a gas station is a sign for a gas station. The artist tells them that a gas station is a sign for a gas station. The young men say, Well, thats not quite right. The woman explains that a gas station is a sign for a gas station. The artist tells them that a gas station is a sign for a gas station.

Result #2

arebyte Gallery presents a new commission by UK based artist Alan Warburton. RGBFAQ comprises a research-led experiential exhibition in which the audience navigates a "black-box" set populated by gigantic geometric sculptures. Warburton’s ambitious new video essay will be projection mapped onto this sculptural background, expanding the form of his popular video essays (Goodbye Uncanny Valley, Fairytales of Motion) into an immersive 3D space, with a soundtrack by David Kamp. The installation includes a single video projection of the duo. The two singers play the two parts of the song Waiting for a Time in the Land of the Fairytales of Motion, and the two video projections merge to form a seamless visual composition, with the two singers, a red dancer and a black one, singing and dancing in a synchronized series of movements. The two halves of the piece are projected onto the two monitors, so that one is shown on the left side of the screen and the other on the right. The two singers, the red one and the black one, are shown at different speeds, and at different times, in various locations in the world, from London to New York. The two dancers are constantly moving, so that the red one turns into a long, straight, and very dark line, the black one into a very short one. At one point, the red one steps into a black hole and at another, he is shown walking across a large field of grass. These images, and the reds movements, are projected on two walls, creating an abstract space of motion and shadows. The same images and shadows are projected onto two video monitors, the two screens of which are then overlaid on the two monitors. The two projection monitors, which create a landscape of movement and shadows, are placed close to one another, creating a kind of spatial landscape. The reds and blacks movements are projected onto one monitor, then onto another, and so on, and on, until the black is almost completely obscured by the reds. The result is a kind of large and complex illusion. The illusion is a visual one, a projection of the images of the two dancers onto two different screens, but also a visual one that is both visible and invisible, a projection of the images of two different viewers.

Result #3

arebyte Gallery presents a new commission by UK based artist Alan Warburton. RGBFAQ comprises a research-led experiential exhibition in which the audience navigates a "black-box" set populated by gigantic geometric sculptures. Warburton’s ambitious new video essay will be projection mapped onto this sculptural background, expanding the form of his popular video essays (Goodbye Uncanny Valley, Fairytales of Motion) into an immersive 3D space, with a soundtrack by David Kamp. The video traces the workings of a system of two-way mirroring, in which viewers are instructed to move between two different vantage points, one of which is mirrored in the other. The mirrored image of the first and the mirror of the second are both turned on and off at various points in the video. The result is a cacophonous cacophony of reflections, voices, voices, and voices, in which the viewers reflections are alternated with the faces of two women who have been watching the video for twenty years. In a taunting moment, a woman says: Now that the two of you are both dead, we can begin to talk. The other two women comment on this comment with one of them: You are the two who will die first. The two women who have been watching the video for twenty years will speak for the first one, and the other one: The time is coming when we are going to die. The video concludes with the view of a mirror on which a disembodied voice says: If we cant talk, we will never speak. The voice of the second woman, who has been watching the video for twenty years, is heard saying: I dont want to die. A voice-over continues: If we cant talk, we will never be able to. A voice-over continues: It is the only way we can express our emotions. The voice of the third woman, who has been watching the video for twenty years, says: It is not the place of the artist to tell you what to do.The video is narrated by a group of women who live in the north of England. They speak with a combination of stilted English and stilted Australian accent, and their voices are punctuated by frequent references to Hollywood films and television. They talk about love, their lives, their memories, and their dreams. One of the women says: We are not just talking about art. We are talking about power.

Result #4

arebyte Gallery presents a new commission by UK based artist Alan Warburton. RGBFAQ comprises a research-led experiential exhibition in which the audience navigates a "black-box" set populated by gigantic geometric sculptures. Warburton’s ambitious new video essay will be projection mapped onto this sculptural background, expanding the form of his popular video essays (Goodbye Uncanny Valley, Fairytales of Motion) into an immersive 3D space, with a soundtrack by David Kamp. The exhibition contains a selection of black-box works, which include an armless rubber doll, a projection of a person walking through a tunnel, a video of a photographer walking through a tunnel, and a video of a woman walking through a tunnel, which is projected onto a black-boxed form. The show has a video installation (the works are mounted on the wall) that functions as a laboratory for the viewing of the black-boxed work. The video installation also includes a black-boxed piece of paper with a handwritten text and a photograph of the artist. The piece is composed of two black-boxed projections: the one projected onto a black-boxed piece of paper is a close-up of the artists hand, while the other is a shot of the black-boxed projection. The hand-held video, which is being projected onto the paper, is also a close-up, and is in turn projected onto the black-boxed projection. The hand-held video is a two-shot, one-shot shot, and the projected one, which is a close-up of the artist's hand. The two shots are projected onto the black-boxed projection, and the two shots are connected by a shot of a tunnel. The tunnel is the final image of the two-shot shot; the two-shot shot is the projection of the two-shot shot. The two-shot shot is the projection of the two-shot shot; the two-shot shot is the projection of the two-shot shot. The two shots are each projected onto a black-boxed projection, and the two-shot shot is a close-up of the projection of the two-shot shot. The projection of the two-shot shot is the projection of the two-shot shot. The two-shot shot is the projection of the two-shot shot.

Result #5

arebyte Gallery presents a new commission by UK based artist Alan Warburton. RGBFAQ comprises a research-led experiential exhibition in which the audience navigates a "black-box" set populated by gigantic geometric sculptures. Warburton’s ambitious new video essay will be projection mapped onto this sculptural background, expanding the form of his popular video essays (Goodbye Uncanny Valley, Fairytales of Motion) into an immersive 3D space, with a soundtrack by David Kamp. Warburtons short video essay begins with a black-box projection of a black box, a gateway to a black box, which is itself projected into a black box. The projection is accompanied by a voice-over monologuing about the various aspects of the black box: a box for the imagination, a box for the mind, a box for memory, a box for the machine, a box for the black box, a black box for the black hole, a black box for the black hole, a black box for the black hole, a black box for the black hole, and finally, a black box for the black hole. The voice-over then shifts to a voice-over monologue of the black hole, which is itself projected into a black hole. The voice-over then shifts to a voice-over monologue of the black hole, which is itself projected into a black hole. The black hole is a black hole, but also a black hole, and the two coincide. The black hole is a black hole, and the black hole is a black hole, and so on. The black hole is the black hole, and the black hole is a black hole, and so on. The black hole is the black hole, and the black hole is a black hole. The black hole is the black hole, and the black hole is a black hole. The voice-over then shifts to a voice-over monologue of the black hole, which is itself projected into a black hole. The voice-over then shifts to a voice-over monologue of the black hole, which is itself projected into a black hole. The black hole is the black hole, and the black hole is a black hole. The black hole is the black hole, and the voice-over then shifts to a voice-over monologue of the black hole, which is itself projected into a black hole.

©2021 Lucidbeaming