Brayden's leaf balls and bed paintings were situated

Result #1

Brayden's leaf balls and bed paintings were situated vernacularly in the exhibition space. While the rest of the room was left bare, the flotsam of Styrofoam and sea foam—inspired by the artists and friends swimming in the pool at the end of the summer—was a curious and somewhat unsettling juxtaposition. The objects were all the same size and shape, but each had been cut up and mixed together to create an object of equal shape and size, so that the piece became a playful and humorous puzzle. The pieces seemed to be sculptures of a floating world, an unruly conglomeration of the most disparate parts, some of them connected by a little plastic bridge. The sculptures were all placed on the floor, and their arms and legs were painted in the same color as the rest of the sculptures, so that they could be seen from all sides. This method of presenting the sculpture as a part of the world of things made clear its connection to the surrounding space, and also its close association with the work of Michael Heizer and others of his generation who have made the sculpture as a gesture of social protest rather than as a functional object.While these assemblages were certainly of a playful and humorous nature, they also evoked a sense of historical time and place. This was especially true of the large foam-filled foam cups, made from the same materials as the sculptures, which were arranged in a circle in a corner of the room and were clearly marked with the date of their making. They seemed to represent a time and place that were as distant as the work of Jasper Johns and as close to home as the work of any number of New York artists. The contemporary viewer could sense that these cups were not toys, but rather something that could be used and enjoyed. They seemed like an idyllic home, with the smallest one measuring approximately the same size as a typical teddy bear.

Result #2

Brayden's leaf balls and bed paintings were situated vernacularly, in a corner, on a desk. This was a good thing, for it allowed the viewer to see the work without having to see it from a distance, and also allowed him or her to see the work from a distance as well. The work is a cube, and the viewer is supposed to see the cube as a cube. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. There is a tension here, a tension between the three-dimensional and the three-dimensional, between the three-dimensional and the three-dimensional, between the two-dimensional and the two-dimensional. This tension is not only in the geometry of the work itself, which is an important element of it, but in the tension between the two-dimensional and the two-dimensional, between the three-dimensional and the two-dimensional. The two-dimensional objects are the rooms, and the two-dimensional objects are the objects. And the two-dimensional objects are the two-dimensional objects, and the two-dimensional objects are the two-dimensional objects. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room. The cube is a room, and the cube is a room.

Result #3

Brayden's leaf balls and bed paintings were situated urn-like in a corner of the gallery, where they were surrounded by two paintings that were framed and hung on the wall. This exhibition was like a scene in which the artist had left the artist's room to roam the city, searching for the hidden object that would illuminate the city. And like a film, the artist's room, with its dark, dark and dingy interior, could be seen from a great distance. The room was like a movie set, which made the room's dark interior seem like a stage. The painting and the paintings were like movie props, which, as if it were a stage on which a silent movie is being projected. This painting/paintings room was a kind of stage set, and one could sit on the floor and watch the projection of a movie on a small monitor. The film was a fantasy of a little girl playing with her toy airplane, while the painting was a scene from a film by the Belgian painter Marcel Duchamp, and it was a scene from a painting by the English artist Thomas Struth. The painting/paintings room was like a movie theater, with rows of seats arranged in a series of tight curves and narrow passageways, like a movie screen. The projection of the film was projected on a monitor, and the painting was a projection of a painting by Thomas Struth, who lived in London and was very familiar to me. The paintings were also like movie props, like props from a film. They were the projection of the film. The projection of the paintings was also a projection of the paintings, like movie props. The projection of the paintings was like movie props, like movie props. The projection of the paintings was like projection of the paintings, like movie props. The projection of the paintings was like projection of the paintings, like movie props. The projection of the paintings was like projection of the paintings, like film props.

Result #4

Brayden's leaf balls and bed paintings were situated vernacular objects. In the exhibition's last room, for example, a giant, egg-shaped stack of plastic flowers was hung on the wall like a giant Gulliver. And in a room filled with the ghosts of photographs of the artists family, a tiny photograph of the artists mother (who died of AIDS-related complications) appeared in a glass case, next to a small table containing a few books on the subject. The image was accompanied by a text on the wall that read, I have never been to a home as beautiful as this. In the gallery's last room, a photograph of the artists father, who died of AIDS-related complications, was arranged in a circle of mirrors. On the wall was a small, framed portrait of his mother, also deceased, with a hand holding a large mirror over her head, as if she had stepped into the frame. The two images of the artists fathers house, in the form of a giant photograph of a huge map of the Earth, lay side by side on the floor. This final room was filled with the ghosts of photographs of the artists fathers house, which had been destroyed by the artist's father, who committed suicide in the late 1980s. Each ghost was accompanied by a note, which was also an inscription. In one case, the note read, I am your father; in another, I am your son. A note added by an angel in a church in the center of the town of Ouro Preto in the Ivory Coast stated, I am your daughter and I love you. A note by a second angel in a church in São Paulo read, I am your son and I love you. A note by a third angel in a church in Lima read, I am your daughter and I love you. A note by a fourth angel in the city of São Paulo read, I am your son and I love you.

Result #5

Brayden's leaf balls and bed paintings were situated vernacularly in the gallery's center. A small, bare-chested mannequin, dressed in a green shirt and khaki pants, stood directly across from the window; a large painting of a plump yellow plump, juicy pink belly, and a tiny plump, pudgy one-armed mannequin, with a plump, phallic head, sat on the window ledge. In the middle of the room, a pair of knickers, one a striped blue and the other a striped pink, stood on the same narrow metal stool, facing the window. In this way, the male and female figures of the picture were juxtaposed, as if in a sex shop, and it was obvious that the mannequin was the man in the striped shirt and the striped pants. The mannequin's body and the striped shirt were the same, but the striped shirt had a plump, juicy, pink belly while the mannequin's body was a mottled, fleshless and frumpy pink. A strange, layered sexiness underlay this droll, sexless play on sex, sexuality, and the body. One felt as if one were watching a house party where a womans body was the focus of attention while the mannequin's sexless body was the focus of attention. By painting the mannequin's sexless body the same color as the one on the ground, Brayden also framed the relationship of the two parts of the body as a sexual one. In this way, the paintings were both pictures of the body and pictures of a body, and both were pictures of the body as a body, which could be understood as a body without sex.Brayden's work is sometimes hyperrealist, but this was a more subtle approach to body representation than most body art. His pictures were not simply body-oriented; they were paintings of the body as an empty, fleshless, and fleshless space.

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