Trevor Ganske is a multi-media artist and illustrator, blending architecture and landscape using laser cut wood, inspired by southwestern US mid-century style.

Result #1

Trevor Ganske is a multi-media artist and illustrator, blending architecture and landscape using laser cut wood, inspired by southwestern US mid-century style. The artist and his wife, the artist, and his daughter, the artist, and the artist and his daughter, the artist and his daughter, the artist and his daughter, and the artist and his daughter, the artist and his daughter, and the artist and his daughter. The five works on paper here consist of sixteen sheets of black paper glued together, together with a small paper bag on the wall next to each sheet, creating a small square of space. In each sheet, the artist has carved a letter of the alphabet and has written on the paper. There is no letter, no letter that is legible; the letters are blurred and indistinct. They look like the translucent surface of a monochrome drawing, with a couple of tiny paint marks on each sheet. The letters do not look like themselves; they are often blotted, and the marks create areas of shadow and light. They are not simply drawings, however; they are layered and layered, their surfaces layered and overlaid. The size of each letter varies; some are very small, others very large, and they do not all fit on the same page. These are not wordless drawings; they are not about words, but about the relationship between drawing and writing. These drawings are not simply a snapshot of a particular place, but they are also highly personal letters that reflect the artists thoughts and feelings.The drawings are all made in wood-grain on paper, which makes them not only sculpture but also a kind of cast of a miniature world. It is a world that is internally and socially connected, and that the artist has seen and felt. The drawings are not paintings, however; they are not sculpture, nor are they drawings in the traditional sense. They are letters, carved in black marble, with carved letter-heads. The shapes are clearly not carved, but they are carved, and the letter shapes are clearly not the letter shapes of the original. The drawings are not paintings.

Result #2

Trevor Ganske is a multi-media artist and illustrator, blending architecture and landscape using laser cut wood, inspired by southwestern US mid-century style. In his drawings and paintings, Ganske uses colorful, highly detailed, and volumetric forms and structures to represent the potential for making cities into spaces, as in the drawings, or as if they were scales. In the works, his subjects are all cities—from Tokyo to Bali—but all are arranged in gridlike arrangements that fuse with one another, creating a sense of cumulative movement, of being connected in time and space. A number of the drawings are completed with a reference to the city as its architect, and are dedicated to the idea of an urban identity in which every individual is assigned an identity and is reflected in a generalized place, rather than one within a specific space. Ganskes drawings are also filled with notes and studies for his models, which are unreadable, but which create an atmosphere of enigmatic atmosphere. The drawings reveal a knowledge of both the formal and the theoretical aspects of drawing and an ability to use it as a means of exploring the implications of composition.The exhibition consisted of three drawings, four paintings, and a sculpture. All are examples of Ganskes architecture of movement and time, in which he is concerned with the complex relationship between drawing and painting. The drawings, which depict buildings, streets, and streets, are rendered in acrylic on paper. The paintings are made of paper, and are based on photographs of buildings that have been overlaid with lines of black paint. These works include a mural-scale drawing of the building, a painted mural, and a piece that depicts a street, which Ganske then incorporated into his sculpture. The drawing of the mural is also a drawing, but it is painted on a piece of paper. The black line that runs the length of the wall is a drawing, but it is divided into three sections and appears to be an abstract image. The black is a reference to the black-painted walls of a Mexican plaza; it also appears to be a reference to the black paint on the mural.

Result #3

Trevor Ganske is a multi-media artist and illustrator, blending architecture and landscape using laser cut wood, inspired by southwestern US mid-century style. He uses the two-dimensional space in a way that refuses the flatness of the two-dimensional image. The viewer has to negotiate a delicate balance between being within the image and being beyond it. Ganskes cutting of large areas of wood and painting over them, with the exception of the edges, seems to imply a living space that is more corporeal than a mere image-bearing space. This is a unique and elegant way of creating images that are not simply two-dimensional, but also 3-D.Ganske cuts up his images and recombines them in a number of ways, including cutting, melting, spraying, and cutting up the original photographs. The process of cutting, melting, spraying, and cutting up is reminiscent of the cutting of wood in art, where it has always been a method of creating original forms. In this case, the artist introduces his images into a process of destruction and reassembly that is both physically and emotionally demanding. The process of cutting into and over the original wood creates an image that is both fluid and intangible, and yet seems to be cut up and reassembled, as if it were a form, into which the images that Ganske so easily manipulates an entire series of images.Ganskes cutting and melting techniques, together with his cutting and melting of images, are a way of creating an image that is not only two-dimensional, but also three-dimensional. This is also true of the images Ganske uses as bases for his cut-up images. For example, he shows us images of trees and a house, cutting and melting them into a series of three-dimensional shapes. The cutting and melting of these images creates a landscape with a horizon line, while cutting and melting the woody forms into three-dimensional shapes.

Result #4

Trevor Ganske is a multi-media artist and illustrator, blending architecture and landscape using laser cut wood, inspired by southwestern US mid-century style. His two-part video installation, Tower of Babel, 2000, was projected in a state of deconstruction on a wall; a voice-over is projected on a box of white T-shirts and some of their inner pockets, and an image of a necktie—a work by the artists frequent collaborator, the musician Adrian Ghenbach—is briefly seen on a screen behind a table in front of a series of white T-shirts. The T-shirts themselves are cut up and rearranged and placed on a pedestal, where they form a sort of giant pedestal for the T-shirts. The voice-over tells a tale of a crime committed by a woman who leaves her husband to travel alone. She turns into a doppelgänger, and at the end of the video, the man behind the desk is revealed to be her, and the two have a showdown. The voice-over recites a passage from the novel The Judgments of Man by the Philosopher G. Peishel, which gives the tale a poetic ending: The woman who has left her husband for travels is returned to him. She returns to him and his companion, who are still inside their house, still a woman. They have no idea what has happened. They hear a noise, but never approach. They see a woman turn toward them, who disappears into the darkness. . . .They think she has gone out of the frame. The woman disappears again. The couple turn back toward the door and see another woman, who disappears into a white dress. The voice-over continues: They turn back toward the door. They turn back toward the door. She reappears and again disappears. The voice-over tells the story of the women arrival at a bar. The voice-over continues: The woman they had left behind is still there, still dressed in her usual dress. They turn back toward the door. . . .She reappears and again disappears.

Result #5

Trevor Ganske is a multi-media artist and illustrator, blending architecture and landscape using laser cut wood, inspired by southwestern US mid-century style. His recent exhibition presented twenty-two stunning gouache and acrylic paintings on canvas.The paintings, titled Magpie, 2010, are simple but effective, with a combination of painterly splattering and spray splotching that is both playful and sculptural. All are painted in lush greens, blues, and pinks, but each is animated by an intricate pattern of painted ornaments, a motif that becomes a decorative motif that looks like a graphic or sculptural version of the woodcut-style ornament. Several of the pieces were inspired by a World War II bomber that was constructed out of cutout wood with the intention of deconstructing the war machine. The fragments that result are considered in the context of an abstract art form, and as such they are no more than decoration. But they also have a sculptural quality that is not entirely the result of the process of cutting and painting.The works are rather like a miniature set of figurines, with their legs and arms taken to extremes of elongation, and with the artist working with a minimal vocabulary of abstract shapes. The left hand is cut, as if the hand had been cut from a tennis ball and then painted. On the right, the head has been cut to look like an open book. This action also draws attention to the hand, which is painted to suggest a very delicate, hand-drawn line. The right hand is cut, and the lower part of the body is implied. The artists hand is a drawing of his fingers, and his arm and the right hand are painted black. A single leg, which has been cut out of a tennis ball and left the same color as the body. These two motifs are joined by the line that connects the two, which again looks like a drawing of a leg, and one could be read as a reference to a line.The effect is that of a painting that is both dynamic and still, rather than a painting that is static and nonfunctional.

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