dysfunctional autonomy - a dysfunctional account (?) - use in some unfamiliar / strange measure (for us humans) of the platform organization of images exempted from a human decision and the surprise that comes from it underlines our conditioning, introduces a small fright mystery / suspense psychic hacker

Result #1

dysfunctional autonomy - a dysfunctional account (?) - use in some unfamiliar / strange measure (for us humans) of the platform organization of images exempted from a human decision and the surprise that comes from it underlines our conditioning, introduces a small fright mystery / suspense psychic hacker puzzles to find the missing pieces, as if they were missing the coded code by mistake, and a little cat had stolen the pieces. Faced with a work that aspires to the same level as Richard Hamiltonns electric fingerprints (by order of 1992) of metaphoric manipulation, are these artist and Herrobi would have been working with the necessary fortitude and imagination to make the omission look like a chance action, like a mistake, like an anagramment? The four x-rated projections on the wall are, if anything, more convincing because the only pieces of the imagination in them are the artist and the viewer, the same ones that would have been lurking in the drawings, waiting to be solved.There is an equal and opposite power to a world where the participation of the viewer is made mandatory, and in which one is almost always at a disadvantage. Here the camera angles are such that one looks downward at the projection (of the visual camera) and presses the desired button, then turns and watches the projection on the screen. It is a self-imposed, self-suggestion, which is all but obscured by the fact that the sound is playing. These are optical manipulations of a stolen, manipulated, and manipulated world that one cannot help but suspect is inside the body of the viewer. Yet there is also a dissonance, a joyous, eerie, and now curiously elegiac humor in the programming of such a world.In Katera (Katera), 1991, the artist is shown as a sailor who, as she marches down a black street, places her face to the camera and, as she watches, the picture becomes a photo of herself, in her imagination. In an instant, the small camera on the wall and the voyeuristic pan in the room, a little reduced to its tiny size, make the sailor appear a victim, a victim of the cameras gaze.

Result #2

dysfunctional autonomy - a dysfunctional account (?) - use in some unfamiliar / strange measure (for us humans) of the platform organization of images exempted from a human decision and the surprise that comes from it underlines our conditioning, introduces a small fright mystery / suspense psychic hacker paralysis. Haute daffin was a gory, early-70s YouTube sensation who posed as a fake crone with a pulsing automatons ear and knotted tentacles; he gained considerable attention from all the fuss over her sexual appropriation of graphic models, and she became a slightly less popular figure, after being sued and subsequently evading arrest for her female/identical activity. (Her version of Net-Cosmics, a kind of queer feminist political cartoon in which a young woman was digitally blown up to be a woman, was screened in her early-90s Chelsea loft space; an unpublished DVD was shown in the back room.)This show featured photographs by, among others, Adriana Burkhards, Kiki Szapocznikow (an artist with whom she collaborated in the late 1990s), a portrait of her ex-boyfriend the poet Mary Marie Franks, and a group of four photographs by Sara Scott and Carol Levy. The series features work from 1969–90, the year of her graduate study with Cindy Sherman, and includes several portraits of Burkhards during her period of active artistic engagement with networks and communities of women in Los Angeles, and of Levy in particular. Other work includes a pair of text-based works—a text written by Burkhard, a portrait by Levy, and a photograph of a 1977 Sundance Film Festival festival that included some of the artists poetry, and the artists essay in collaboration with Shermans. (One hopes she would return to the film festival circuit in 2018.) The shows press release cites a curious feature of these photographs: Burkhards arrangement of text within the images and figures suggests a mirroring between the works visual and literary elements. This is not necessarily a negative. On the contrary, it is a reassuring, albeit irksome, contrast to the images and texts that often define the feminist legacy of poststructuralism.

Result #3

dysfunctional autonomy - a dysfunctional account (?) - use in some unfamiliar / strange measure (for us humans) of the platform organization of images exempted from a human decision and the surprise that comes from it underlines our conditioning, introduces a small fright mystery / suspense psychic hacker-theorists (a field in which the meta-politics of the artist is less important than the technology) are always going to be confused. In the midst of an esthetic and social machine, I am always perplexed by the passion of artists, and the artist or producer. This is why I like the work of Anthony Camara, a young artist and son of an artist father and a teacher mother. His work is inevitably complex, whether he works in a certain style, with certain motifs or not, with certain approaches to the whole or for that matter, with every visual object.In the work of Camara, this passion goes beyond the base-level of a reaction to the world to become an active, global, causal condition in which the viewer participates in a more complex world. The images are not simply of an external location (i.e., of the artist in Paris, at the ICA) but of the community in which Camara lives and works as well as of his more recent "off-site, painted-over, otherworldly locations, urban landscapes, and his new, highly conceptualized images.I do not mean to say that Camara has been asked to approach a specific, comprehensive, or postmodern problem. The artists work, whether he uses a monochrome, a new digital image, or some other specific material to cover a large area or create an entire series, remains immediately recognizable. The issue, however, is how he creates a system of images in which the whole of his individuality is visible. In this way, he writes, I reject the claim that art can be an image or an expression of any concept or idea.

Result #4

dysfunctional autonomy - a dysfunctional account (?) - use in some unfamiliar / strange measure (for us humans) of the platform organization of images exempted from a human decision and the surprise that comes from it underlines our conditioning, introduces a small fright mystery / suspense psychic hackering, from which I first learned the power of visual cravings to see and enter into a kind of control over consciousness, of being able to look and find a face. His trick may be erotic, but is it any more interesting than the frontality of the dummies? It is a strange, old-fashioned eroticism and even more strange that someone from a different cultural and political context is able to bring such a work, so light, so personal, into the white box of art. What is the point of painting anything that could possibly be a hard-core porn star?Not surprisingly, with the assiduous attention of the main body, theres nothing but a very old-fashioned woman in the museum making her way in a nice white dress, her black boots and a black skirt perfectly matching her flowing black gown, her shoulder blade up. She appears at the entrance, as if she were, and her look is as nostalgic as her usual dress. Laid over the wall, her dress is on a shelf; it is a gown that has been worn, layered, and pressed to the hilt. Her head is as long as her body, she is not dressed. If you look closely, youll notice a tiny mirror behind her, and maybe a pair of large legs which extend her skirt to the barest ankle, touching the floor, as if she had touched the floor and stepped on it. And then youll notice her eyes, a peculiar shadow.Theres a high probability that you will never look again at the same person. The mirror is the only real barrier, the only indication of your presence, the only indication that you have ever entered the museum, that you are a part of this dream. Its a very evocative image, even though its false, because it brings up all sorts of personal questions. Theres an ovation, an elation.

Result #5

dysfunctional autonomy - a dysfunctional account (?) - use in some unfamiliar / strange measure (for us humans) of the platform organization of images exempted from a human decision and the surprise that comes from it underlines our conditioning, introduces a small fright mystery / suspense psychic hacker thriller, its not very much, but that silence adds up to a threat, a question, and a third term, a very serious note. A painting-like blue ribbon marks a hundred-foot line on a distant horizon. It is not a mark to be ignored, but only to be understood. A half-hour telephone call to a friend says that in a little while the line will disappear and the picture will be there. We can now draw our conclusions, or not, but there are definite clues. . . . The picture is here. It has disappeared. . . . We have been here twenty minutes. . . . the film starts again. . . . the sound and music start again . . . and we see a very long, thin, blue ribbon trace a meter across the line, and the first person on the line looks very nervous and begins to speak in a low, jumbled, dark, husky, verbose tone . . . his first words are: its a big picture . . . well, it is a painting . . . are you sure? . . . hes talking about the band? . . . hes talking about some paintings? . . . hes talking about his girlfriend? . . . hes talking about a river? . . . hes talking about a cow? . . . hes talking about a bush? . . . hes talking about the band . . . hes talking about a mountain? . . . hes talking about a body? . . . hes talking about a river? . . . hes talking about the river? . . . hes talking about a line? . . . hes talking about a bush? . . . hes talking about a river? . . . hes talking about a mark? . . . hes talking about a line? . . . hes talking about the river? . . . hes talking about a grassy knoll . . . hes talking about a bush? . . .

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