In his recent solo exhibition Causers, Hemmo Siponen produced a body of watercolour paintings, that addressed multiple different causes of uncertainties and indeterminacies around us.

Result #1

In his recent solo exhibition Causers, Hemmo Siponen produced a body of watercolour paintings, that addressed multiple different causes of uncertainties and indeterminacies around us. The works, which depict the artists own life as a young man, young woman, and a young girl, were painted in an abstract style, but not without an element of color, as if to suggest that there are no clear boundaries between us and our desires.In the exhibition, Hemmo Siponen evoked the beauty of a young girl with her head bowed and her hands held in a gesture of supplication. In the background, a young man with a cigarette is seen from behind, his hand on his chest as if he were telling a woman to stop. He looks directly at the viewer, as if he were about to say something, but she does not hear him. Her only response is to keep her distance and look at the girl from the side. The scene is framed by a white wall with a black figure silhouetted against it. The figure is posed in a pose of surrender and submission, but the gesture is clearly directed at the viewer. The other figures are also standing, but they are also facing away from the viewer, as if they were about to turn their backs on him or her.In another work, Hemmo Siponen presents a scene of a man and a young girl. The man is seated on the floor, but the girl is looking toward him. This scene is divided into two parts. The first is a still life, in which the two figures are in a bathtub, while the second part is a portrait. In the first part, the man looks toward the woman, who is standing nearby. The scene is also a still life, but it is not so much a portrait as a scene in which the two figures are not exactly on the same level. In the second part, the woman looks toward the man, who is standing on the floor. The difference is that the man is standing on the floor and the woman is standing on the wall. The two figures are separated from each other by a wooden chair.

Result #2

In his recent solo exhibition Causers, Hemmo Siponen produced a body of watercolour paintings, that addressed multiple different causes of uncertainties and indeterminacies around us. In the works, a single figure, or a group of figures, are often suspended in an ambiguous space. In one work, for example, a young man sits on a chair with a head facing the viewer. In the left-hand panel, a male figure is seen in profile, but in the right-hand panel a female figure is seen from the side, but she is no longer the same woman, so that in the right panel, the left-hand panel, and the right-hand panel, the figures are reversed. In another work, the figure is seated in a chair in a park. The right-hand panel shows a figure that is seated in a chair in the same park. The left-hand panel shows the same seated figure, but now the right-hand panel is in profile and the left-hand panel is in profile, so that in the left panel the figure is upside down. In the right panel, however, the figures are in the same position as in the left panel. In the left panel, the figures are in the same space as the right panel. The two halves of the right panel are in profile, and the two halves of the right panel are in profile. The right-hand panel is inverted, and the left-hand one is inverted too. The figure in the right panel is seated on the chair with head turned toward the left and a hand cupped at the neck, and the left-hand figure is standing, and the left-hand figure is in profile. The right-hand figure, however, is upside down and the left-hand figure is upside down. The right-hand figure is upside down, but the left-hand figure, in profile, is upside down. In the left-hand panel, the left-hand figure is upside down and the right-hand figure is upside down.

Result #3

In his recent solo exhibition Causers, Hemmo Siponen produced a body of watercolour paintings, that addressed multiple different causes of uncertainties and indeterminacies around us. The artist takes his inspiration from the experience of an asylum in Austria, where he was allowed to work. Here, the art of the asylum is what unites the works. Siponen has used watercolors in past exhibitions, but here they were applied to the gallery walls with adhesive tape, and the resulting imprints are the artists own. The title of the exhibition refers to a method of the asylum system: the asylum is the place where the artist is allowed to work, but the work is not allowed to be made.The exhibition opened with a series of black and white paintings, a kind of diary of the asylum and its situation. The paintings are often divided into two groups: scenes of the asylum and rooms where the asylum is housed; and rooms in which the artist is allowed to work. Siponen uses the same technique in both cases: he uses a painting technique to make two distinct paintings. In one case, he uses the same technique to make two different paintings, and in the other, he uses a technique to make two paintings. The paintings are usually hung at the same height, and the space is always the same, although the walls and ceiling change position. The space of the asylum is characterized by a strict hierarchy of requirements: the artist must stand at the top of the gallery, and the room below him. In the case of the paintings on the walls, the artist is kept at a distance from the wall. The artist is permitted only a few steps to the top of the gallery, where he can rest, or lie down, on a bench or a chair. He is then allowed only a few more steps, which are followed by another one, and then another, until he is placed on a bench. The position is a work of the artist, who is thus forced to concentrate on the task at hand.

Result #4

In his recent solo exhibition Causers, Hemmo Siponen produced a body of watercolour paintings, that addressed multiple different causes of uncertainties and indeterminacies around us. The artist, who has always been deeply rooted in the Finnish landscape, has been working in this tradition for more than ten years, and this show was no different. The show opened with a series of watercolors, painted on paper, that depict the sites of accidents in Finland. The watercolors are of the artists own conception, and they depict accidents that have occurred in his studio. The artist also makes use of the accident site as a subject for his paintings, with the exception of one piece that depicts a collision between two cars. The most recent accident occurred in a bar. In this case, the accident was a result of a misunderstanding between two people, who were arguing about who had won the jackhammer. The accident was also a result of the artists intent to paint accidents that happen in everyday life.The other two accidents that were depicted in the watercolors are those that occured outside the artists studio, and thus they were not included in the exhibition. The first accident occured when two cars collided in a parking lot. This collision was captured on a video. The video shows the cars in the parking lot, and the two drivers stopping. The collision was captured by a security camera that was installed in the camera and recorded the event. The accident was also a result of the artists intentions, and thus the accident was an objective part of the work. The second accident occured when two people in a wheelchair got into a fight. The fight was captured by a video. In this case, the fight was between two people who had a history of violent outbursts, and this fight was also captured by a camera. The fight was also a result of the artists intentions, and thus the fight was a objective part of the work.The other accident occured when two people got into a fight in a park. The fight was captured by a video, and the two people exchanged words.

Result #5

In his recent solo exhibition Causers, Hemmo Siponen produced a body of watercolour paintings, that addressed multiple different causes of uncertainties and indeterminacies around us. The exhibition consisted of a large number of watercolors, and in some cases, also included drawings and collages, as well as printed matter and photographs. The drawings, on paper, were made in a straightforward style, and contained a vague narrative that was simplified and simplified by the use of blackboards, which allowed the viewer to follow a parallel path through the work.The paintings were made in a more conventional manner, with watercolor, acrylic, and oil pastels. The subjects were mostly everyday objects and photographs of the artists own experiences, which were abstracted, simplified, or deleted altogether. The works were made of acrylic and wood, with a lot of white on the edges. The colors were mostly in shades of black and white, and were usually divided into several separate layers. In some cases, Hemmo Siponen painted over a portion of the entire image, leaving the area visible, but in others, he simply left the whole thing visible, as in a photograph. The paintings were usually done in a single, continuous line, or the lines were so short that they became invisible.The collages, on paper, were also more or less abstract, and included both images and ideas. One collage contained an image of a door, framed by two white rectangles, and it was covered in various kinds of paper-and-fabric appliquéd patterns, which were layered over the image. The collage was titled Cinéma de la rue (Collage of the Room). The title of the collage was taken from a line in a song by the French pop group Chardelle, and the collage as a whole was a kind of hybrid collage of images and sounds. In the last piece, which was also on paper, Hemmo Siponen painted over the entire image, painting the entire surface over the collage, leaving it to disappear, as if it had been painted over.

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