The artist pounds with his hammer, a strip of aluminum. The result is a floating strip; a loop in space.

Result #1

The artist pounds with his hammer, a strip of aluminum. The result is a floating strip; a loop in space. Its a bit like a windmill, but more difficult to control. The whole thing is a sort of experimental sculpture. When you stand in front of it, you look at it from above, and its almost impossible to see it from below. You can only look from the ground. The piece is completely invisible to the point that you can hardly see the piece from the ground, but its the only work in the exhibition that doesnt require a lot of clearance. (The work is situated in a gallery, but not as a sculpture; it cant be easily seen from the street.) Theres nothing to see from the ground. The work is so small that you cant really see it from the ground either. Its a bit of a slog to get there. In the end, though, you have to walk around the piece to find out how it works, and its not much fun. But its not the most interesting thing in the show, either. Its a good piece of sculpture.Next to the work is a series of 12 black-and-white photographs. The title of the series is just a title, but the images arent titles. They are more like pictures of the artwork itself. The pictures arent labeled as such, but they do have tags, and they are the works of the same image. The tags have an ISBN number, and the images are all identical. They look like they could be taken for the same people who did the taping of the film. They are like the two-dimensional canvases, but their surfaces arent real; theyre three-dimensional. Theres a big square, and then a lot of horizontal lines, and a lot of white. It looks like a photo-Realism painting, or maybe a re-creation of a picture of a painting. In the end, though, its a combination of two different kinds of work.

Result #2

The artist pounds with his hammer, a strip of aluminum. The result is a floating strip; a loop in space. This piece is part of a series, and it is made of the same aluminum that is used to cover the metal frame of the work. The aluminum is not a metal, but the result of a casting process, and the result is a form that is like a work of sculpture. In the process, the aluminum is cut into a shape that is a perfect circle with a hole at one end and a hole at the other. This piece is a perfect circle, a perfect circle in space, a perfect circle in space, a perfect circle in space. In fact, the hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle. The hole at the center of the circle is a perfect circle, the perfect circle of the circle. This is the perfect circle of the circle.

Result #3

The artist pounds with his hammer, a strip of aluminum. The result is a floating strip; a loop in space. But the loop is a perfect circle, the yellowish-orange field of the steel welded over and over again, a circle that, as if pulled from the ground, becomes a floating city. The question is: what does it mean when the city is in the air? The piece is an attempt to answer that question, to transcend the question of the city as a thing in space, and to show that a city is not only a thing in space, but a thing in the air. The piece is also an attempt to show that, in the process of making art, one is not only making a thing, but also making an art.For all the beauty of the piece, however, it is made to look like a conceptual exercise. It is about the experience of the city, but one that is more concerned with the possibility of getting close to the city than with what is on the surface. The city is not to be looked at with the eyes of a viewer, but with ones hand. As if to emphasize the difference, the city is not marked with the cityscape. One is instead drawn by the line of the line of the line, and the cityscape is what is seen, not what is. The city is not the site of a city, but rather a line of distance. And one realizes that this is a problem. One is tempted to make a cartographic map of the city, to mark it with lines of reference. But one is not so much drawn in as seen in. The city is only seen in the eyes of the viewer. And one realizes that the city is not a place where one can go to sleep, but rather, the cityscape. The cityscape is always in a sense a place, an abstract space of reference. And the cityscape, then, is not a place where one can stay to look at art, but rather, one can only look at art, to mark it with lines of reference.

Result #4

The artist pounds with his hammer, a strip of aluminum. The result is a floating strip; a loop in space. The sculpture is a string of beads. The beads form a string which is held in place by a knot of rope. The rope is pulled up by the knot to form a rope which hangs down in the space; the string is then pulled down again to form the string. The struts of the rope are then pulled up to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down again to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled up to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled up to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled up to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled up to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled up to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement. The struts are then pulled down to form a series of struts, as in a flower arrangement.

Result #5

The artist pounds with his hammer, a strip of aluminum. The result is a floating strip; a loop in space. The question is: What are the implications of this? For the artist, the connection is already made explicit. What is the connection between the work, the two aluminum strips, and the piece? Are they parts of the same piece? What is the connection between the hammer and the aluminum strip? Is there any connection between the hammer and the aluminum strip? The painting is quite clearly a drawing—and the hammer is in the paint. It is an object, but one which is seen in the process of being made, and one which is not a painting. It is a hammer.It is as if the artist had asked the question, What are you going to do with this hammer? It is as if he had asked, Are you going to paint it? The answer is a painting, which is itself a painting. The question becomes: What are you going to do with this hammer? And the answer is, Im going to paint it. But this painting is not merely a hammer. It is also a painting. It is a painting. The question becomes: What are you going to do with this hammer? And the answer is, Im going to paint it. The question is, What are you going to do with this hammer? And the answer, No. What are you going to do with this hammer? Paint it? The hammer is not a painting. Its a painting. But what are you going to do with it? Paint it? The answer, No. Paint it? Again, the hammer is a painting. It is not a painting. Paint it? Again, the hammer is a painting. The question is, What are you going to do with this hammer? Paint it? The answer, Im going to paint it. The question is, What are you going to do with this hammer? Paint it? It is a painting. What are you going to do with it? Paint it? It is a painting.

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