My works present an independent reality, a world that is dependent on our real world yet is separate from it. I seek to deconstruct the reality that we inhabit in order to remake reality according the logic inherent in the painting process. The paintings explore semi-real spaces where nature and architecture come into confrontation, and themes such as climate change are of implicit interest. Aesthetically, I am mainly interested in the dissolution of space, perspective, light, and time through varying degrees of figuration where form is created through a responsive and adaptive process over a length of time. Colours and shapes are reworked until an ideal solution is found. The process itself mirrors the way time works – gradually shifting reality until what is familiar evolves into something renewed.

Result #1

My works present an independent reality, a world that is dependent on our real world yet is separate from it. I seek to deconstruct the reality that we inhabit in order to remake reality according the logic inherent in the painting process. The paintings explore semi-real spaces where nature and architecture come into confrontation, and themes such as climate change are of implicit interest. Aesthetically, I am mainly interested in the dissolution of space, perspective, light, and time through varying degrees of figuration where form is created through a responsive and adaptive process over a length of time. Colours and shapes are reworked until an ideal solution is found. The process itself mirrors the way time works – gradually shifting reality until what is familiar evolves into something renewed. And, because the work is based on the nonlinear, the viewer becomes aware of the work as an almost infinite, almost cyclical process that oscillates between space and time. The works are never really finished, but the result of a series of episodic steps that continue to be carried out, as if time and space were equal, and that could never be contained but existed on the border between them. But the titles of the works emphasize the point of moving forward. The images that are never completed, and thus remain fragmented, are thus evidence of a progression of events that will always be ongoing, as if time itself had become a continuous journey. They reflect the persistence of an ideal, a utopian position that the artist can always reappropriate in order to create new situations and situations.This process is reflected in the works reality by a tendency to use a series of motifs that repeat themselves, each time with different variations. For example, one can observe a vertical line of stars, which sometimes recalls a vessel; a boat in the foreground of the painting, with its reflection in the water; or a certain kind of human figure, standing on the left and looking right, as in an art gallery. In one case, a woman, whom the title also names, stands on the right and is reflected in the same vessel, as in a photograph. The viewer can imagine that this female figure is both represented by the image of the vessel, and by the woman herself, the vessel herself. It is a constant process of recognition and rerecognition, a process of development.The works also imply a link between space and time, as a result of which time is also a kind of space. The time of the picture, the time of the sea, the time of the river—all these things are suggested by the same line of stars. The picture line that repeats itself, that of the picture surface, is a result of a process of transformation, of transformation.

Result #2

My works present an independent reality, a world that is dependent on our real world yet is separate from it. I seek to deconstruct the reality that we inhabit in order to remake reality according the logic inherent in the painting process. The paintings explore semi-real spaces where nature and architecture come into confrontation, and themes such as climate change are of implicit interest. Aesthetically, I am mainly interested in the dissolution of space, perspective, light, and time through varying degrees of figuration where form is created through a responsive and adaptive process over a length of time. Colours and shapes are reworked until an ideal solution is found. The process itself mirrors the way time works – gradually shifting reality until what is familiar evolves into something renewed. The works are often black, as if to symbolize the spatial and temporal void. These black paintings are only rarely accompanied by the white paper support; instead, an adhesive or adhesive-like material is used. The paintings are not merely about the dead, but also about the site of the future, which is always further removed from us than we imagine. It is the future of a perfect and utopian world that we cannot bear.The black paintings are imbued with a timeless, timeless quality, but they are also about the notion of time. In Black Paintings, the images seem to be of a very particular place, a nonplace. They are about what time is, not about what time might be. They are also about a refusal of time, about time, about the imagination of time, about the process of painting itself. This is also the case with the white paintings, which are abstract drawings in white oilstick on white paper. The drawings are the result of a similar process, but the drawings are not meant to be interpreted. They are about themselves; about the art of drawing, and about the fact that we cannot fully grasp the image of a drawing without looking at it. In fact, the drawings seem to be metaphors for the art of painting, for painting itself. They are also about the work of art itself. They are about the art of painting as a process. They are also about a space that is both present and absent. The white paintings, on the other hand, are abstractions that are detached, nonreferential. They are about painting as painting, not about painting as a process. They are abstractions that evoke a space that is neither present nor absent. The white paintings are not merely about the image of the white canvas, but about painting itself as painting. They are also about a process of painting, a process that creates a space that is neither present nor absent. The white paintings are not abstractions but images of painting.

Result #3

My works present an independent reality, a world that is dependent on our real world yet is separate from it. I seek to deconstruct the reality that we inhabit in order to remake reality according the logic inherent in the painting process. The paintings explore semi-real spaces where nature and architecture come into confrontation, and themes such as climate change are of implicit interest. Aesthetically, I am mainly interested in the dissolution of space, perspective, light, and time through varying degrees of figuration where form is created through a responsive and adaptive process over a length of time. Colours and shapes are reworked until an ideal solution is found. The process itself mirrors the way time works – gradually shifting reality until what is familiar evolves into something renewed. The paintings depict this process of disintegration, the de-creation of space through a continuous dissolution that is both poetic and disturbing. They evoke a situation in which, in the end, all is irreversibly lost. The first room in the gallery was filled with works on paper. The titles of the works—all untitled and dated from 2016–, except for two paintings from 2016—displayed a remarkable degree of individuality: Those works, however, were not painted on the wall, but were printed onto canvas. The works were based on the same foundation as the paintings, but the works on paper are more formal than the paintings. The figures of the works on paper have a greater sense of detachment from the paintings, and their expressions are more self-contained. With the exception of the paintings, which are the most complex, each figure is composed of multiple parts that are at once concrete and abstract, logocentric and anthropomorphic.The works in the second room were composed of large pieces of wood that had been treated with aqueous solution. At the same time, they also included wooden sculptures. In the previous room, these pieces had been installed on the floor, which in turn was placed on a wall that was the same height as the canvas. Here, the sculpture, the piece that was furthest from the painting, was placed on the floor at an angle that gave the sculpture a more natural posture. Another sculpture, a wooden piece, was positioned on the floor nearby. Here, the sculpture was supported by three wooden pieces that had been placed on the floor. The piece, called Time Piece, 2016, is a small wooden sculpture placed in a wooden box. In this piece, the wooden box is a kind of frame, which gives the sculpture an absolute framework, an empty space in which to act. The wooden pieces that are still attached to the box have been dropped off the wooden pedestal, which leads to the next work, Time Piece, 2017.

Result #4

The works also demonstrate the way that the desire to express ones desires in a work of art can become an act of violence. In one case, the desire for control is reinforced by the inability to achieve a form that is both accurate and complete. The form is suggested, but it is obscured by the viewer. Thus, the desire for control and control is made both visible and empty. Thus, a work of art is not only a means to a desired end but also an action. It is a form of negotiation, a potential act of aggression against the world. In this respect, the works are an attempt to learn from reality, to enter into a dialogue with it, and to overcome the separation between the outside world and the artists own world.

Result #5

The paintings are beautifully realized and, in their openness, subtle yet invulnerable, offer a space in which to experience change. They are also a way to articulate the new by making it part of everyday experience. They demonstrate the power of the human voice, its directness, and its ability to communicate the urgency of an experience that seems distant, urgent, and difficult.In the work of Michael Krebber, it is often the passive image of the self that serves as a vehicle for the unveiling of the Other. Krebbers paintings use the figure of the artist as a point of departure for the making of representations, which are more or less explicit statements about how we perceive the world. The painter-historist interprets the figure as an organ of perception that conveys the current through painting, but that can also be a reflection on the past or on the future. The self is the experiencer of the past and the experiencer of the future, a unity that is realized through painting. Krebber shows us the history of the human mind and its ability to interpret the world through the ways in which it is expressed through perception and memory. One might say that Krebber is a precocious painter whose paintings are art-historically true, revealing their own precociousness through a superb understanding of the art world.

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