The performance work of Brian Fuata spans emails, ghosts and collaborative modes of inquiry.

Result #1

The performance work of Brian Fuata spans emails, ghosts and collaborative modes of inquiry. The artists aim is to investigate the relationship between the body and the media, and to transpose that relationship into a new form. The work is comprised of photographs, photographs and related documents that relate to the body and the media. Fuata began by photographing the body of the artist and his partner in various situations. These pictures document the artists physical and mental activity as well as the subjects personal and cultural identity. The photographs are then pasted onto canvas, placed over the images, and covered with black tape, which Fuata then applied to the images. He then removed the tape and covered the image with it, painting the image on the painting. The photographs are then pasted onto the paintings, which are then pasted onto the photographs. The process is repeated until all the photographs have been photographed and pasted onto the paintings. The two artists appear to be speaking in different voices, and it is this dialogue that Fuata is interested in exploring.He also considers the body as a site of appropriation, as a place that has been appropriated, and as a site of repossession. This concern is expressed by the two artists who perform in the show: a photographer and a painter. The photographer, Gino de Dominicis, uses a camera to take pictures of his partner, who is then incorporated into the work. The pictures are then pasted onto canvas and covered with black tape. In another instance, Fuata showed the pictures of his partner in a different manner. They are pasted onto the pictures and covered with black tape, which he then applied to the pictures, painting them on the canvas. The photographer, Gino de Dominicis, also uses a camera, but this time to take pictures of his own paintings. This process is repeated until all the pictures have been photographed and pasted onto the paintings. The two artists appear to be speaking in a different voice.

Result #2

The performance work of Brian Fuata spans emails, ghosts and collaborative modes of inquiry. The artist, who was born in Italy and lives in Spain, has been invited to participate in several group exhibitions, including the 2006 Venice Biennale, and in this exhibition he responded to a call for an international exhibition with his own project.Fuata began the work by manipulating the walls with a form of metronome-like movements. He then began to lay down on the floor a selection of papers on which he had written or drawn and which he had used as the basis for his drawings. His subjects included a page from an international art journal, a letter from an artist, a letter to a publisher, a list of objects from the artists studio, and a letter from a friend. Fuata then transferred the drawings to a large, dark-blue cloth, and covered it with paper. The result was a kind of cross between an artists canvas and a blackboard, with the paper that was cast over the drawing of the blackboard, a representation of a closed system of thought. The artist then asked his assistants to carry the cloth out to the room, where he had placed a number of small, small white panels and placed them directly on the floor. The works that followed were variously related to the elements of the artists studio, the events of his life, and the activities of his friends. The artist then moved on to the room where he had placed a number of drawings, but these were in fact the result of an activity he had undertaken in his studio. The studio was transformed into a gallery space, with the white paper laid out on the floor and covered with paper. A group of five blackboards, also on the floor, contained the drawings that had been placed in the room, and were also placed on white boards. The white boards were covered with an identical white paper. The white paper was then removed, and the blackboards were left to rustle and rustle again.

Result #3

The performance work of Brian Fuata spans emails, ghosts and collaborative modes of inquiry.  These elements were present in two presentations, both in the form of objects.  The first was a public event: a three-hour performance, in which the artist, in a wheelchair, walked with a cane on a hot summer day.  He spent the day in the city, talking to passersby, talking to himself, listening to his own music, reading, and listening to the music of the city.  In the second presentation, he did the same thing, but took the event as an opportunity to play a game of identity politics.  He gave a speech about his sexuality and about his struggle with homosexuality.  He asked passersby if they would like to play the game and gave them a card, which they took.  At the end he said to himself, What do you want? He took the card and kept it.  The card was the same one he gave to the artist, who was asked to keep the card.  He took the card and kept it.  The cards presence in the game, and the work as a whole, was a brilliant example of identity politics.  It was also a very effective way of showing that identity politics is a form of play.  It is about a game, and one that is constantly changing, and about which one must play.  In this case, the game was identity politics, but it was also about identity as an act.  It was about how one can play identity politics, and how one can play the game of identity politics.  And it was about the act of playing.The game was a game, but it was also about identity as an act.  It was about identity as a play, and about the act of playing. The game was about the act of playing, and about the act of playing.The game was about identity as a play.  It was about identity as an act.

Result #4

The performance work of Brian Fuata spans emails, ghosts and collaborative modes of inquiry. The artist is a professor of art history at the University of California, San Diego, and an expert on the history of performance. In his ongoing series of Ghost Stories, he writes and rewrites ghost stories, in which the artist participates as a ghost, to reflect on the way the body is transformed through language and the way the mind is made to experience the world. In Ghost Stories, 2003, he creates a series of ghost stories, in which the artist and his assistant are the ghosts of people who have been deceased. They act out ghost stories, in which the artist has the role of the ghost. The ghost can be identified as the artist, the assistant, and the deceased. The ghost is also the artist, the artist, and the deceased. In Ghost Stories, 2002–2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend. In Ghost Stories, 2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend. In Ghost Stories, 2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend. In Ghost Stories, 2002–2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend. In Ghost Stories, 2002–2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend. In Ghost Stories, 2002–2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend. In Ghost Stories, 2002–2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend. In Ghost Stories, 2002–2003, the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend, and the artist is a ghost of his deceased friend.

Result #5

. . . and works of art. Fuata is a talented young artist with a large body of work in the realm of the creative, and it is great to see him in a public gallery. He has been accepted into the ranks of the modern artist, and he has had a number of solo shows, including one in the gallery of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. A number of his works have been exhibited in the city. In a larger context, however, Fuata is a vital presence in the contemporary art scene. His work has been appropriated by a number of artists, including Sean Landers, Robert Morris and, most recently, Joe Scanlan, who has made a name for himself as a collector. The reception of his work has been greatly influenced by the cultural milieu in which he lives and works. In the late 70s, for example, he was part of a group of artists who created a series of sculptures based on the famous Coca-Cola ad. The piece was shown in his home in Upstate New York, and in 1988 he opened a gallery in Los Angeles. Recently, he has been included in the group of artists who have been collecting Coca-Cola cans in the gallery, and he is also planning a show of cans from his collection in LA. It is a timely opportunity for an artist to exhibit in a commercial gallery.

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